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If you're only painting the visible parts, then you should be fine. I'd recommend taping off the spring area and leaving that as is. I paint my weapons using Duracoat. You'll want to use some crc brakleen or similar solvent degreaser to remove all traces of oil or lubricants, then rough up the surfaces with some fine grade sandpaper to ensure a good bond with the paint. If using Duracoat, plan on many many light coats. You should still see the black coming through after the first several coats if you're applying light enough. The objective is to let each coat dry before applying the next, which if done correctly is about 20 minutes. I usually take 6 or 8 hours to paint a firearm, only putting it back together a week after it's painted, then only firing it again a month after it was initially painted in order to let it fully cure. Take your time and be patient if you want it to be perfect.

Also, if you do need to remove duracoat, I recommend Naval Jelly made by loctite. I put on too much my first firearm and found that nothing seemed to remove the duracoat. Something I appreciate now, but at that time... didn't. The naval jelly stayed on the slide of my firearm for 6 hours before I was able to remove the duracoat with a brillopad. I had checked every half hour and just about gave up. I wouldn't recommend using naval jelly on plastics or polymer materials.

On a side note, I also painted my hand. It stayed bright blue for about 3 weeks. Very annoying to have to explain that to ppl every day. I wear gloves now and I suggest you do as well.

Take your time, go slow and hopefully any mistakes you make will be small ones.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you're only painting the visible parts, then you should be fine. I'd recommend taping off the spring area and leaving that as is. I paint my weapons using Duracoat. You'll want to use some crc brakleen or similar solvent degreaser to remove all traces of oil or lubricants, then rough up the surfaces with some fine grade sandpaper to ensure a good bond with the paint. If using Duracoat, plan on many many light coats. You should still see the black coming through after the first several coats if you're applying light enough. The objective is to let each coat dry before applying the next, which if done correctly is about 20 minutes. I usually take 6 or 8 hours to paint a firearm, only putting it back together a week after it's painted, then only firing it again a month after it was initially painted in order to let it fully cure. Take your time and be patient if you want it to be perfect.

Also, if you do need to remove duracoat, I recommend Naval Jelly made by loctite. I put on too much my first firearm and found that nothing seemed to remove the duracoat. Something I appreciate now, but at that time... didn't. The naval jelly stayed on the slide of my firearm for 6 hours before I was able to remove the duracoat with a brillopad. I had checked every half hour and just about gave up. I wouldn't recommend using naval jelly on plastics or polymer materials.

On a side note, I also painted my hand. It stayed bright blue for about 3 weeks. Very annoying to have to explain that to ppl every day. I wear gloves now and I suggest you do as well.

Take your time, go slow and hopefully any mistakes you make will be small ones.

Jason

Thank's a lot for the input Jason , I really appreciate it .

Doug
 

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Thanks for the info Jason. I just got set up to Duracoat and appreciate the very, very light coat advice. I tend to over do things like that. I'm doing a Glock 17 next weekend for my first project and will wear gloves so I don't have to explain Desert Mirage Sand hands.
 

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20140625_155952.jpg

Hope the picture posts. I finally got the guts to Duracoat my G17. Just need to drop off at my armorer to get my sights put back on. Thanks again to Jason for the advice. The hardest part is mustering the courage to start spraying. I'm really happy with the GLK Dark Earth color. I will post a warning - Once you start Duracoating, it's hard to stop. Over one weekend, I did my G17, 308 AR, M&P15, and Mossberg 500. I only stopped because I ran out of paint. Next is the PS90.
 

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Nice!!!
 

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I know your on a painting roll but since the receiver is aluminum you could have it anodized and or hard coated /anodized. Several coating companies offer colored anodizing.
Color Anodizing - Medical Device - Sporting Goods - Firearms - Electronics
Just an idea, the normal " Batch " price is $130... approx. The engineer in charge of introducing the " color option program " name is Brian.
That is the route I would go. Better yet if your interested in the anodize ??? I would help you out, I'm sending a batch of 160 pieces to anodize here tomorrow ( OP you would have to next day your reciever to me today ) I would add it to one of my 3 batches and it wouldn't cost you much ...

Let me add ... there would be a processing cost , the threaded holes in the reciever would have to be re-tapped using a different thread class that effects the pitch diameter. It needs to be larger ( pitch diameter ) to accomodate the anodizing.

Just an idea !
mjk1
 

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Cerakote.
 
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