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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was wondering if there are any veterinarians (or people who have had similar issues with pets) on this board? I could use some advice or a second opinion.

I realize someone giving medical advice online could be held legally responsible, so I absolve you of any liability in advance and promise to clear any medical advice with my own vet before applying it.

My 4 yo. (indoor only) cat has Feline Eosinophilic Granuloma ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feline_eosinophilic_granuloma ), her skin is fragile and it turns into big and scabby areas where she licks the fur and top layer of her skin off. Her skin is so fragile that she wore through it on the back of her hind legs, and the bone is slightly exposed (hole is maybe 2-3mm diameter at this point, no infection) on her left hind leg elbow. The other one thankfully healed back up. She unfortunately doesn't seem to give a sh!t and is pretty active (crazy, more like it), so keeping her from damaging it further is really difficult. She already ripped stitches and glue once (while it was wrapped up.)

I have the leg wrapped up with gauze (I rinse the wound with saline and benodine, then cover with anti-bac ointment prescribed by my vet) and self adhesive stretch bandages. But ultimately it won't completely heal unless it gets air, which is difficult because she starts ripping at the wound or dragging it on the ground, in the litter box, etc. She will rip the bandage off if not tight enough, and if too tight her paw swells up at which point I have to rewrap the leg. She does all this while wearing a soft cone over her head.

Only other meds she is on is frontline and hypoallergenic, skin-support food (ridiculous that I need a prescription to buy my cat food!)

My own vet is dedicated and competent. He has administered local steroid injections (and she got oral antibiotics for a while), but healing is really slow and I just need as much information as I can get on the issue. Or at least helpful comments from y'all on how to keep her from messing with the wound until it heals.

I know some people don't like cats, but she's family, so keep the shotgun comments to a minimum :tongue:
 

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Good luck with your cat monsterdog.
 
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Sorry I'm not of any help, but all the best to the little girl.
 
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Have you looked into a probiotic for your Li'l Girl? Steroids can and sometimes do create a vicious cycle constantly needing more with only short term temporary improvement of symptoms. As with us Humans most of an animals ability to fight infection comes from our gut, if it ain't right not much else will be especially skin. Any imbalance can and usually does manifest itself in the skin, the largest living organism in a mammals body. Most Medical professionals are against things that curtail their continued "treatment and prescriptions" 'cause they won't make any money. Have you ever read what's in Frontline? It's poison obviously, it has to be to kill fleas and ticks, would you want to topically apply or ingest poison routinely? I would hope not! All this crap about prescription food does little to help anything except someone's bank account. Look into the new foods that are all natural containing more meat than grains, carnivores aren't supposed to eat grains, it's at odds with their genetics just like humans aren't supposed to eat wheat, hence gluten intolerance and so forth. I know this because my Li'l Lady has a Master's Degree in this sh!t. Eat right! Stay healthy and Doctor free!
 

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Actually, carnivores do eat grain.

When a lion takes a herbivore and eats the guts, the stomach and intestine are exactly full of grain. However there is a fad to feed animals grain free stuff as well, so it does exist.

Call the IAMS hotline 1-800-525-4267 and ask if they have any advice on feeding guidelines. I'm sure the CS rep who answers the phone will not know, but if you ask, they will likely refer the question to one of the product development people who know their stuff. Sometimes, some of these afflictions can be caused/cured by diet.

Art
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everybody :)

SeaMac, I've looked into some of those things. This particular issue is an auto-immune problem and is aggravated by allergies. I've tried every grain free food I could find and the only thing that was helpful was this particular hypoallergenic prescription food (cost the same as the natural ones we tried.) It contains exactly the same ingredients as the non-prescription foods I tried (duck and pea, no grains), but because the proteins are treated a certain way it doesn't create an allergic response. The only thing I've not tried is a whole, raw diet (basically giving her a raw chicken drumstick and a piece of liver to chew on), but am considering it at this point.

Like you say, frontline is poison, and I hate using it on her, but we needed to rule out a flea or mosquito allergy aggravating this. Normally we have not used any kind of treatment like this on her because she's an indoor pet, and not at high risk for stuff like that.

My vet is pretty natural and doesn't seem super invested in getting continuous money from me, to the point where he doesn't just prescribe pills or treatments except when necessary. He told me several times it's not a good idea and in fact has me putting her outside in the sun for a few minutes once in a while and he made me buy an aloe vera plant to help her skin heal. Both things he doesn't get a dime for, he also usually doesn't charge me just to look at her or change her bandage :)

Her allergies seem to be seasonal and environmental in nature, but they are just symptoms of something that seems ultimately hereditary in nature. My project this weekend is to pull a bunch of old wall-to-wall carpet out of my house to minimize how much stuff can build up in our environment.

The one thing my vet doesn't understand is exactly how nuts this cat is, because in the vet clinic is is very timid and just sits there. There is simply no way I can pull the bandage off her and not have her aggravate her injury. Even if I hover over her every second, suddenly she will take off and tear the wound open just a little more without a bandage on.

I like your suggestion of a probiotic, I'll try and find an appropriate one for her :)
 

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Well, you can't argue with that gastronomical logic at all! You just can't, and thanks for the clarification. :?

For further reading about the things we eat and how they affect us, I recommend Dr. Ray Peat, Ph.D a man who spent his career studying how different foods are utilized by the body, it's surprising to learn that a great many aliments can be prevented if not cured by like Art stated.....the correct diet. Interestingly, we each have our own unique ability to consume and utilize foods depending on where our ancestors originated. The same rules that apply to us generally apply to all mammals. The Li'l Lady has reams of info related to subject matter.

Actually, carnivores do eat grain.

When a lion takes a herbivore and eats the guts, the stomach and intestine are exactly full of grain. However there is a fad to feed animals grain free stuff as well, so it does exist.

Call the IAMS hotline 1-800-525-4267 and ask if they have any advice on feeding guidelines. I'm sure the CS rep who answers the phone will not know, but if you ask, they will likely refer the question to one of the product development people who know their stuff. Sometimes, some of these afflictions can be caused/cured by diet.

Art
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Actually, carnivores do eat grain.

When a lion takes a herbivore and eats the guts, the stomach and intestine are exactly full of grain. However there is a fad to feed animals grain free stuff as well, so it does exist.

Call the IAMS hotline 1-800-525-4267 and ask if they have any advice on feeding guidelines. I'm sure the CS rep who answers the phone will not know, but if you ask, they will likely refer the question to one of the product development people who know their stuff. Sometimes, some of these afflictions can be caused/cured by diet.

Art
Some form of plant matter is definitely vital to cats, they eat certain grasses and stuff in nature after all. The foods we have tried have used peas or sweet potatoes to provide nutrients and carbs. Some commercial cat foods contain more grains than protein (or proteins of a pretty inferior quality) though, which is definitely not natural.

We used to feed our cats IAMS, but suspect they changed their recipe or manufacturing process a few years ago. One of our cats just couldn't deal with it any more and got sick, changing his food helped and we heard from several more people who had very upsetting experiences from feeding their cats IAMS (and several other commercial brands.) That of course doesn't mean their people won't know what they are talking about.

But you're right, diet is a huge issue with pets (and humans for that matter), the immune system starts in the gut.
 

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A lot of people don't understand that the Sun is a great source of vitamin D which is very helpful to the skin. As for auto-immune system issues that could very well stem from an imbalance in her gut. I would seek out the appropriate probiotic, fortunately they are becoming all the rage now and it's actually something that's good for us. Good to know your Vet isn't one of the greedy ones which usually means he actually cares about animals and not just dollars. You may have hit a nail since she's an indoor only cat, there could be an allergen source in your home. I'll have to check w/The Li'l Lady but there are a few labs that will send you a sampling contraption that you send back and they can analyze for IAQ, Interior Air Quality, it isn't that expensive IIRC.

Thanks everybody :)

SeaMac, I've looked into some of those things. This particular issue is an auto-immune problem and is aggravated by allergies. I've tried every grain free food I could find and the only thing that was helpful was this particular hypoallergenic prescription food (cost the same as the natural ones we tried.) It contains exactly the same ingredients as the non-prescription foods I tried (duck and pea, no grains), but because the proteins are treated a certain way it doesn't create an allergic response. The only thing I've not tried is a whole, raw diet (basically giving her a raw chicken drumstick and a piece of liver to chew on), but am considering it at this point.

Like you say, frontline is poison, and I hate using it on her, but we needed to rule out a flea or mosquito allergy aggravating this. Normally we have not used any kind of treatment like this on her because she's an indoor pet, and not at high risk for stuff like that.

My vet is pretty natural and doesn't seem super invested in getting continuous money from me, to the point where he doesn't just prescribe pills or treatments except when necessary. He told me several times it's not a good idea and in fact has me putting her outside in the sun for a few minutes once in a while and he made me buy an aloe vera plant to help her skin heal. Both things he doesn't get a dime for, he also usually doesn't charge me just to look at her or change her bandage :)

Her allergies seem to be seasonal and environmental in nature, but they are just symptoms of something that seems ultimately hereditary in nature. My project this weekend is to pull a bunch of old wall-to-wall carpet out of my house to minimize how much stuff can build up in our environment.

The one thing my vet doesn't understand is exactly how nuts this cat is, because in the vet clinic is is very timid and just sits there. There is simply no way I can pull the bandage off her and not have her aggravate her injury. Even if I hover over her every second, suddenly she will take off and tear the wound open just a little more without a bandage on.

I like your suggestion of a probiotic, I'll try and find an appropriate one for her :)
 

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I'm a little hesitant to recommend it because you can find reviews that are all over the place, but you may want to look in to Dinovite. When we moved from VA to TX our Akita developed terrible skin problems due to allergies. She went through several rounds of steroids, which would ease the problem for the duration of the medicine, but it would come back right after the treatment. We went ahead and tried Dinovite. She's been on it for nearly two years and it has made a marked improvement. They recently came out with a version for cats.

Like I said, it worked for the Akita. Just something to consider.
 
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I'm a little hesitant to recommend it because you can find reviews that are all over the place, but you may want to look in to Dinovite. When we moved from VA to TX our Akita developed terrible skin problems due to allergies. She went through several rounds of steroids, which would ease the problem for the duration of the medicine, but it would come back right after the treatment. We went ahead and tried Dinovite. She's been on it for nearly two years and it has made a marked improvement. They recently came out with a version for cats.

Like I said, it worked for the Akita. Just something to consider.
Vitamin E is on my list, and my vet already said it might help, along with various "good fats". I've tried something similar, Norway Pure Salmon Oil. It has virtually no other ingredients and come in a non-toxic green metal bottle, but does not contain a vitamin E supplement. We tried giving her an oil based vitamin E supplement, but getting it in her was more or less impossible, same with the salmon oil, your powdered product may work. Thanks :)
 

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Vitamin E is on my list, and my vet already said it might help, along with various "good fats". I've tried something similar, Norway Pure Salmon Oil. It has virtually no other ingredients and come in a non-toxic green metal bottle, but does not contain a vitamin E supplement. We tried giving her an oil based vitamin E supplement, but getting it in her was more or less impossible, same with the salmon oil, your powdered product may work. Thanks :)
Like I said, some reviews for it are terrible, so I don't want to sound like a shill. We tried it as a Hail Mary move, and our whole experience is a one dog case study.
 
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Like I said, some reviews for it are terrible, so I don't want to sound like a shill. We tried it as a Hail Mary move, and our whole experience is a one dog case study.
As long as no-one died from it or something horrible like that. The vet already told me omega 3/6 + vit. E will help some, but obviously not cure the problem, since the severe skin reaction to allergens is only a symptom of an underlying auto-immune disease.

My main concern right now is how I get her leg to heal, that will be a major milestone, then I can at least monitor it and wrap her back up for a day or two before she tears a new hole in it.
 

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Actually - call the Mars hotline as well. They own Royal Canin, Whiskas, etc.

Also consider it might not be an allergy, but a defficiency. The problem with cat (and dogs, but more cats), is that they eat the exact same thing, day in/day out. If that thing is deficient in something they need, there is no alternate source. So you might also consider not which single food to use, but intentionally vary it on a daily basis.

Most dry kibbles will do testing with animals, keeping them on an extended diet of anything new they develop, and monitoring their health. However if your cat has special needs, she might not get all she needs. Just chicken and liver are not good, because it is incomplete - you want something with chicken meal to get more minerals.

You might also want to include people food - cheese, yoghurt (cats are mammals, so they like milk based products), meats.

Have you had blood work done to see if she is deficient in something?
 

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Actually - call the Mars hotline as well. They own Royal Canin, Whiskas, etc.

Also consider it might not be an allergy, but a defficiency. The problem with cat (and dogs, but more cats), is that they eat the exact same thing, day in/day out. If that thing is deficient in something they need, there is no alternate source. So you might also consider not which single food to use, but intentionally vary it on a daily basis.

Most dry kibbles will do testing with animals, keeping them on an extended diet of anything new they develop, and monitoring their health. However if your cat has special needs, she might not get all she needs. Just chicken and liver are not good, because it is incomplete - you want something with chicken meal to get more minerals.

You might also want to include people food - cheese, yoghurt (cats are mammals, so they like milk based products), meats.

Have you had blood work done to see if she is deficient in something?
I was simplifying about the raw diet, sorry, I know a drumstick and a bit of liver isn't enough :) The point is that a raw, whole diet closely mimics how she would eat in the wild. Which means whole, digestible bones, organs, meat, etc. If you follow this you should ideally feed your cat live prey as they eat in the wild (small rodents, birds, reptiles, and insects) and supplement with various plants, but I doubt my wife would allow me to do that :tongue: One close alternative is finding a food source like you would feed snakes, basically pre-killed and frozen whole small prey like mice, rats, small chickens, and rabbits.

Teaching them to eat whole prey, when used to processed food, is probably a different problem.

Bloodwork was done, but I'm not sure if it tested for deficiencies. A deficiency is definitely possible though, and your point about varying the diet is spot on (which is why I was considering a whole/raw diet in the first place.) Other than deficiencies, most problems stem from feeding them the same protein, like chicken, every day. The main food we use are kibbles with duck, but we supplement with quality canned food with various other proteins a couple of times a week.

Most cats love cheese and yoghurt, but cow milk is actually not that great for them. I do give her yoghurt (plain greek) from time to time. Not often though.

If she has a deficiency, I think it's likely a vitamin or mineral, and the suggestions of supplementing with probiotic, prebiotic, omega 3/6, and vitamin E is probably a good start.
 

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My bulldog is on dinovite too! It has helped her coat but she still gets staph on her skin several times a year so im not completely sold on it
 

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My bulldog is on dinovite too! It has helped her coat but she still gets staph on her skin several times a year so im not completely sold on it
:smile:ASK YOUR VET. ABOUT THE NEW DRUG APOQUEL IT WORKS GREAT WITH MY BULLDOGS SKIN ALLERGIES AND AND STAPH INFECTIONS IT'S SUPPOSED TO BE VERY SAFE.
 

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EG is a form of allergic dermatitis. Not likely to be from a food source, but contact such as mosquitos or environmental like carpet cleaners or other chemical irritant, but it could just be idiopathic ie no source. Dietary supplements certainly won't hurt, but unless you find the source of the irritation your left with treating the symptoms. Steroids are the most potent anti-inflamatories you can get, but Benadryl creams or lotions can also help with stopping the scratching. The rash won't kill your pet, but constant scratching will eventually lead to an infection.
 

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Ali G to the rescue! Since we're talking about vets.....

Best wishes, monsterdog!
 

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I was wondering if there are any veterinarians (or people who have had similar issues with pets) on this board? I could use some advice or a second opinion.

I realize someone giving medical advice online could be held legally responsible, so I absolve you of any liability in advance and promise to clear any medical advice with my own vet before applying it.

My 4 yo. (indoor only) cat has Feline Eosinophilic Granuloma ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feline_eosinophilic_granuloma ), her skin is fragile and it turns into big and scabby areas where she licks the fur and top layer of her skin off. Her skin is so fragile that she wore through it on the back of her hind legs, and the bone is slightly exposed (hole is maybe 2-3mm diameter at this point, no infection) on her left hind leg elbow. The other one thankfully healed back up. She unfortunately doesn't seem to give a sh!t and is pretty active (crazy, more like it), so keeping her from damaging it further is really difficult. She already ripped stitches and glue once (while it was wrapped up.)

I have the leg wrapped up with gauze (I rinse the wound with saline and benodine, then cover with anti-bac ointment prescribed by my vet) and self adhesive stretch bandages. But ultimately it won't completely heal unless it gets air, which is difficult because she starts ripping at the wound or dragging it on the ground, in the litter box, etc. She will rip the bandage off if not tight enough, and if too tight her paw swells up at which point I have to rewrap the leg. She does all this while wearing a soft cone over her head.

Only other meds she is on is frontline and hypoallergenic, skin-support food (ridiculous that I need a prescription to buy my cat food!)

My own vet is dedicated and competent. He has administered local steroid injections (and she got oral antibiotics for a while), but healing is really slow and I just need as much information as I can get on the issue. Or at least helpful comments from y'all on how to keep her from messing with the wound until it heals.

I know some people don't like cats, but she's family, so keep the shotgun comments to a minimum :tongue:
Hi Monsterdog, I will PM you my email address.
 
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