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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All right let's get some good debate going on here.

Which is the most practical hand to hand fighting discipline?
 

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SIG-do

Somehow I don't think this is going as planned. :p
 
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Seriously - I always wanted to study Aikido - In the 1990s, there was actually a local place that taught it. My workschedule never allowed it.

Later, when I had the time - I had a bad knee with no cartlidge.... Now, I have 2 bad knees - and the Aikido place isn't open any longer anyway...

Oh well....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
:lol:

That's what I get for trying to get the tactics corner up and going again.

I did watch the human weapon episode on krav maga. Looked pretty bad a$$.
 

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There is a big difference between brawling and fighting. Fighting involves killing, everything else is brawling in my opinion. Snapping the neck is the quickest and most effective hand to hand technique, everything else is foreplay.
 

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Madhouse said:
The best hand-to-hand? The one you know!
I was being totally serious here.

What's the best gun in a gun fight? The one you have in your hand!

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Really though, it's hard to say. Pancration is an excellent set of skills. Krav Maga is also very good. Alot of people say 90% of fights end up on the ground, so you should study ju-jitsu.

Personally, I think the best set of skills is a well-rounded combination of several. I spent 6 years in an Okinawan Kempo school, and I've been 11 years at my current school which is more of a realistic self-defense school. We train against knife, gun and empty-hand. We also do body throws, and a little bit of ground fighting. We also do some typical point-sparring (which I really don't care about).

And don't forget anatomy! I think it's very important to know where to effectively strike, as well as things like which bones are easily broken or locations of nerve clusters. We review how to break down specific body systems: skeletal, respiratory, nervous, etc to the point where they either can no longer fight or are dead.
 

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Snap the neck, C-3 through C-5 keeps the diaphram alive. You can't fight if you can't beath. C-1 and C-2 (axis and atlas) well also get the job done, but they are more protected.
 

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I vote for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu
Very very few people have ever beaten a Gracie. Though those matches never involved pistols.
Not really relevant but here are two of my very favorite martial arts clips.
 

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There is no "best". I received my 2nd degree in Hapkido when I was real young but I couldn't really fight any better than anyone else. I trained in Kempo drills for years and I still couldn't really fight any better. Then I went to LINE school in the Marines and then I finally felt like I had a better ability. Although, I still never became a "bad ass" and got my arse kicked by a couple Navy seals down in Coronado. A few months later I went to CCIT school to be one of a few Close Combat Instructor Trainers (A black shirt). I taught lots of people how to kill but I still wasn't the billy Bad Ass I thought I should have been. Then the MC switched to non lethal Ju-jitsu. I never did any of it. I later paid $1200 to go to a 12 week UFC fighting program in Ocean Side, I made it 4 weeks before I quit. It felt like I was just a dummy getting thrown around for the real pro fighters to practice with.

I am now 33 years old and I now 100% believe what matters is that you learn to commit to what ever action you choose to do. Get a basic grasp of fighting, learn to punch, learn to take a punch, learn to grapple and learn to not ever let yourself get into a position that you have to fight your way out. Although I am now out of shape I think being in shape and having endurance affects your mindset and helps give you the courage to feel confidant, thereby increasing your odds greatly in any situation.

I am to old and to experienced to start fights or allow myself to be put in the situation to fight. If there is going to be physical violence it will be because of another persons actions on me and/or my family and if that ever happens (God forbid) my sidearm will be the thing that ensures that I go home at the end of every night and that my family has a father & husband.

That's my $.02
 

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Wolvee said:
There is no "best". I received my 2nd degree in Hapkido when I was real young but I couldn't really fight any better than anyone else. I trained in Kempo drills for years and I still couldn't really fight any better. Then I went to LINE school in the Marines and then I finally felt like I had a better ability. Although, I still never became a "bad ass" and got my arse kicked by a couple Navy seals down in Coronado. A few months later I went to CCIT school to be one of a few Close Combat Instructor Trainers (A black shirt). I taught lots of people how to kill but I still wasn't the billy Bad Ass I thought I should have been. Then the MC switched to non lethal Ju-jitsu. I never did any of it. I later paid $1200 to go to a 12 week UFC fighting program in Ocean Side, I made it 4 weeks before I quit. It felt like I was just a dummy getting thrown around for the real pro fighters to practice with.

I am now 33 years old and I now 100% believe what matters is that you learn to commit to what ever action you choose to do. Get a basic grasp of fighting, learn to punch, learn to take a punch, learn to grapple and learn to not ever let yourself get into a position that you have to fight your way out. Although I am now out of shape I think being in shape and having endurance affects your mindset and helps give you the courage to feel confidant, thereby increasing your odds greatly in any situation.

I am to old and to experienced to start fights or allow myself to be put in the situation to fight. If there is going to be physical violence it will be because of another persons actions on me and/or my family and if that ever happens (God forbid) my sidearm will be the thing that ensures that I go home at the end of every night and that my family has a father & husband.

That's my $.02
+1 :D
 

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Wolvee said:
There is no "best". I received my 2nd degree in Hapkido when I was real young but I couldn't really fight any better than anyone else. I trained in Kempo drills for years and I still couldn't really fight any better. Then I went to LINE school in the Marines and then I finally felt like I had a better ability. Although, I still never became a "bad ass" and got my arse kicked by a couple Navy seals down in Coronado. A few months later I went to CCIT school to be one of a few Close Combat Instructor Trainers (A black shirt). I taught lots of people how to kill but I still wasn't the billy Bad Ass I thought I should have been. Then the MC switched to non lethal Ju-jitsu. I never did any of it. I later paid $1200 to go to a 12 week UFC fighting program in Ocean Side, I made it 4 weeks before I quit. It felt like I was just a dummy getting thrown around for the real pro fighters to practice with.

I am now 33 years old and I now 100% believe what matters is that you learn to commit to what ever action you choose to do. Get a basic grasp of fighting, learn to punch, learn to take a punch, learn to grapple and learn to not ever let yourself get into a position that you have to fight your way out. Although I am now out of shape I think being in shape and having endurance affects your mindset and helps give you the courage to feel confidant, thereby increasing your odds greatly in any situation.

I am to old and to experienced to start fights or allow myself to be put in the situation to fight. If there is going to be physical violence it will be because of another persons actions on me and/or my family and if that ever happens (God forbid) my sidearm will be the thing that ensures that I go home at the end of every night and that my family has a father & husband.

That's my $.02
Great post. This is someone who has done his homework. The whole neck breaking stuff is a little too Tacti-cool for me.

As far as my 2 cents goes, I've studied everythign from Muay thai, to karate, to kenpo to aikido and brazilian juijitsu. They all have advantages and disadvantages. Grappling arts are really great until you face multiple assailants. If you got his buddy in a mount and pounding him or going for a armbar or a rear naked choke, a criminal will pick up a lamp, hammer, or whatever and brain you with it. Striking arts are good for multiple assailants, as you can hit and run away. But you get taken down and your done.

I think the best thing to do would be to learn Judo and boxing/Muay Thai, if you have time. All three disciplines Force the student to confront a opponent. Aikido is good, but it is too passive for me. I don't want to execute a pin on a criminal, only to be faced with the decision of getting whacked in the face by his friend or letting the bad guy go. Judo you can toss people around all day. Boxing/Muay Thai teaches you how to hit and take a hit.

Finally you have to decide on what works for you. If your a small male or female, you may not be able to execute some of the moves in Judo or generate enough power to knock someone out. So you have to find something that works best for you. If all else fails, get a big stick. Or practice Tae FN do :x
 
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