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I've dry fired my ps 90 only a couple of times and am just wondering if it will harm the weapon???
 

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I don't think a few dry fires are going to hurt. After cleaning and stuff we all dry fire to make sure evrything is working. I wouldn't go around and dry fire it all day though. Like other weapons, dry fireing is hard on the fireing pin.
 

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Dryfiring will not harm a center fire gun. It is an old's wives tale that it will. When you dry fire a center fire gun the firing pin is not hitting anything. Now a rimfire like a .22LR yes that will get damaged. But even the modern day .22's are now coming with things that make dry fire safe. Because they stop it from smashing the barrel.

Dry fire is an important learning technique. So dry fire away.
 

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whitetiger7654 said:
Dryfiring will not harm a center fire gun. It is an old's wives tale that it will. When you dry fire a center fire gun the firing pin is not hitting anything.


That's not entirely true, it depends on the gun. In some cases the firing pin, when dry-fired, hits inside the bolt. Each time it hits, the steel mushes or compresses a little. In the process of being mushed carbon atoms that come across each other bond together. Repeated compression makes large conglomerations of carbon, which is brittle, and breaks.


As for the PS90 I just did some experiments with a half-open PS90 (see pic) and as far as I can tell, THE FIRING PIN DOESN'T bottom out and HIT ANYTHING inside the bolt in the course of a dryfire.

So I say dryfire away. But if anything breaks don't blame me. Have FN fix it! :D
 

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After the last round, there is always a dryfire. Unless you count howmany rounds you fired. :D

I think some of European rifle/carbines has a bolt catch after last round. It means they gotta make the firearm dryfireable. It is not what manufacturer said, but it is a good guess. haha
 
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I have read posts about guns breaking by dry firing. Not PS90s but other guns and even Glocks. So, I would not do it much.
 

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+1 on Whitetiger's comment.

Besides, there is no better marksmanship practice or training than dry fire practice.
 

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whitetiger7654 said:
Dryfiring will not harm a center fire gun. It is an old's wives tale that it will.
Tell that to the leigons of CZ Vz 52 pistols with broken firing pins from doing JUST that... :)

I'm sure it depends on the design of the gun itself... For instance, Glock says dry firing will not harm their pistols.
 

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Axiom said:
I have read posts about guns breaking by dry firing. Not PS90s but other guns and even Glocks. So, I would not do it much.
I find that hard to believe. To dissassemble a Glock you have to dryfire it. Glocks are also used in competitive shooting around the world. During these competitions most have rules that hammer has to be down when not on course of fire. That means after every time you do a run you dryfire the gun. I've never heard of this causing problems.
 

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whitetiger7654 said:
Axiom said:
I have read posts about guns breaking by dry firing. Not PS90s but other guns and even Glocks. So, I would not do it much.
I find that hard to believe. To dissassemble a Glock you have to dryfire it. Glocks are also used in competitive shooting around the world. During these competitions most have rules that hammer has to be down when not on course of fire. That means after every time you do a run you dryfire the gun. I've never heard of this causing problems.

A glock is the last one i would think dryfiring would hurt my 17 & 23 I dryfired about 1000 times or more each.....trying to get the trigger break smooth.......and i shot +10,000 out of the 17 maybe 5-6000 in the 23
 

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Well, I too have read several posts on Glocktalk over the years - excessive dry firing has caused the slide (the area around the firing pin - where the rear of the casing sits) to crack. I've read it more than once. Is it rare? Yes. But, it can happen. Beretta 92s can crack firing pins easily thru dry firing - And HK redesigned the USP pin a few years ago because they were prone to dry fire breakage.
 

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ShipWreck said:
Well, I too have read several posts on Glocktalk over the years - excessive dry firing has caused the slide (the area around the firing pin - where the rear of the casing sits) to crack. I've read it more than once. Is it rare? Yes. But, it can happen. Beretta 92s can crack firing pins easily thru dry firing - And HK redesigned the USP pin a few years ago because they were prone to dry fire breakage.
No i say it can and will happen if you do it often :!: but my glocks seemed tough very tough :shock:
 

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My little take on dry fireing.

Ok, this is a long time debate, why, because there are a few firearms out there that can be damaged by excessive dry fireing. Most of them are rimfires especially old single actions. Firearms that can sustain damage by dry fireing these days are pretty few and far between. Most of the time the owners manual will have a big warning in it about not doing so. Weapons that rely on dry fireing as part of it's function will probably not be harmed. Like Glocks- you must dry fire to take the weapon apart. Same thing goes with Springfield XDs, the PS90 and especially the P90 are dry fired a lot, it's the way the gun yells "empty". Add on top of that, the PS90/P90s, much like Glocks, are designed for the rigors of combat and the designers and engeneers are very smart people and tested these things to points, we as shooters, will never encounter. You gotta trust these guys, Especially FN, They are well aware of the rigors of combat. I've spent tons of time with thier weapons like the M249 SAW, The 240G, My beloved M2 (oh how I miss that one). FN makes these incredible crew served and Squad Automatic rifles for our millitary. Believe me, the get more than thier fair share of dry fireing as well as abuse that would make most of you cry. Last I heard FN also makes M16s. Nuff said right there. I don't think these guys are going to make delicate firearms Especially since in recent times they have completely re-tooled thier plant with brand new CNC machines that monitor quality to outragous extents. So, have a little faith that the company that produces some of the best made combat small arms in the world didn't overlook something as miniscule as dry fire damage.

Even if dryfireing does hurt the PS90 (which, I must say, I SERIOUSLY doubt) it would probably take more dry fireing than you're capable. Plus like I said in the above post. If you dry fire properly, I.E. training and marksmanship practice, you will gain much more by dry fireing than not.

I have dry fired every weapon I own and have owned over and over and over. I will continue to do so. My first professional instructor said it best "you don't get better on the range, you test on the range, you get better durring training and practice sessions which are done without live ammunition" What he said is very true. I realized just how true in 1995 durring phase 2 of Marine Corps Recruit training. There is a 1 week period where marines practice "snapping in" which is a very formal, professional, and painful way of dry fire practice. Put simply,,, dry fire practice works and most millitarys, law enforcement agencies, and professional shooter know that. And allthough, to date, I have yet to damage a weapon from dry fireing, but, even if I did it would be worth it for what is gained.

My informed opinion and educated guess.
 

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I did read you should not "rack" a empty 90 by letting it fall back on it's own. Something about a lip in the chamber that gets damaged.
 

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BMARM4 said:
I did read you should not "rack" a empty 90 by letting it fall back on it's own. Something about a lip in the chamber that gets damaged.
Yes, this is true. Granted, after your last shot, the gun does this on its own, and there is nothing U could do about it then. But on your own, when U know the gun is empty - you should rack it slowly - don't just let go and let it slam home.
 

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Re: You have to dry fire a glock to dismantle it.

glock20-10mm said:
Axiom said:
I have read posts about guns breaking by dry firing. Not PS90s but other guns and even Glocks. So, I would not do it much.
:evil:
I've seen a few posts on Glocktalk about this too. The breach face on the slide breaks/cracks. It can happen with excessive dry firing on a glock.
 

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This will probably brand me a dumbass for my entire time on this board.

But what is the exact definition of 'dry' firing.
 

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ElCidTx said:
This will probably brand me a dumbass for my entire time on this board.

But what is the exact definition of 'dry' firing.
Pulling the trigger w/ no round in the gun (unloaded)
 

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ElCidTx said:
This will probably brand me a dumbass for my entire time on this board.

But what is the exact definition of 'dry' firing.
This isn't a flame board where you are expected to be an expert on every firearm. Please feel free to post your thoughts and questions. We share info here as friends. :wink:

My view on dry-firing is that it is a very useful exercise. I dry-fired my first Glock 17 hundreds of times. No problems. I have dry-fired all my SIGS. No problems.

Can dry-firing hurt guns? It depends on the gun and how much you do it I guess.

My advice is to learn your guns to the point where you can observe what the hammer or striker is doing when you dry-fire.

TA
 
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