FN Herstal Firearms banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,531 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good information!

By Bob Campbell published on April 22, 2014 in Firearm Storage, Safety

When I was a young man, the average living room or den featured a wooden gun cabinet, the stores had racks and safes were unheard of. That quickly changed, and today it would be foolish indeed to rely on a gun cabinet. There is little security. In fact, gun cabinets are not really secure, even from children.


That big bolt means security.

I once had a friend who was a good child, although as curious as any. He had learned how to take the back off of his dad’s gun cabinet—I suppose David was about 11—and reverently showed me the family .32-20 Winchester. It was wrong, even though not unexpected. He did know how to check to see if the rifle was loaded and was very reverent when handling it; however, the old-time gun cabinet had no security. The last one I saw still in use was at the Biltmore mansion in Asheville, NC. I am not a family friend; I was on tour, and the place was well guarded.
It is a moral responsibility, and sometimes a legal one, to keep firearms out of the hands of children and criminals. The first advice I can give is to buy all the safe you can afford at the first chance. Most of the time, we end up with two, or even three, safes. We purchase the first safe, then we keep accumulating the guns of our dreams, and it grows from there. That is prosperity.
If you own a small number of working guns and need to keep the deer rifle, the bird gun, a couple of .22s and the pistols out of the hands of children, you need a gun safe. If the accumulation of firearms is more appealing than the growth of a 401K, you need a larger safe. If you have a steel door on the safe room and just want to keep the children away from the guns, a simple safe—really a metal cabinet—is fine. Fires are terrible, so you need a fireproof safe, although the primary concern is theft. Guns are one of the few things that bring more on the street than they may fetch at retail, which makes them very attractive to thieves.
There is a great disparity in the availability of gun safes. Many are simple locking cabinets; others weigh thousands of pounds. It all depends on your focus. If guns are the focus of your hobby or investment, then the largest safe you can afford is a wise choice. If you collect motorcycles and cars and like a few guns too, then a modest, quality safe is advisable. A locking cabinet is OK for keeping the kids out.
Let’s Talk Features There are many things to consider when purchasing your gun safe. Let’s take a look at a few of them.
The Gauge of the Steel Let’s look at gauges of steel: the lower the number, the thicker the gauge, just like shotguns. A 10-gauge metal is heavier than 12-gauge. You could breach a lighter safe with a heavy axe. Sure, they are easy to move, but that means they are just as easy to steal; do not get a false sense of security.
Fire Rating Fire-tested and affordable Cannon safes are always a good bet.

Fire rating is also important since most of us will store deeds and checkbooks in the gun safe. Not long ago, I was having a problem keeping my oatmeal cookies from my daughter. I have one with my coffee, and she would steal two or three a day. So the oatmeal cookies went in the gun safe; there are many uses (I had to insert that—knives sometimes go in the safe, and I have hidden jewelry just before Christmas as well). The more extensive and expensive your collection, the better the quality of the safe you need to buy, and a large and heavy safe is better than two small ones.
Location Location is important. A professional team of thieves will remove the safe from a home and cut their way into it later; make it difficult to them to get the safe. A doper who breaks in and comes across the safe by accident will sometimes take a sledgehammer to the locking mechanism. The handles may break off, but the safe will remain intact.
Internal and external hinges are a consideration. If the safe has external hinges they are easier to get to and it would still take a great deal of effort to get into the safe.

Plan Ahead Obviously, the heaviest safe is unsuitable for an apartment, and some second floors will not support a safe. As an example, a few years ago I purchased an antique bathtub for the bathroom of the older house where I lived. As it turned out, I had to shore up the floor, and the same for my daughter’s waterbed. Not all homes are made for that type of weight in the corner.
This safe has given excellent service. You must change the dial pad batteries occasionally, but the safe has been trouble free.

As for security, this is common sense: no one needs to know what you have. You should not save the code or combination, unless absolutely necessary. If you copy the combination, store it in a safe deposit box and put the key to the bank box in the safe, you will have a problem.
Back to size—handguns or rifles? The layout is different. Choose wisely, and make your safe purchase a once-in-a-lifetime investment.
Do you keep your guns in a locked safe? What type of gun safe have you purchased (or are planning to buy)? Share in the comments section. Bob Campbell is a former peace officer and published author with over 40 years combined shooting and police and security experience. Bob holds a degree in Criminal Justice. Bob is the author of the books, The Handgun in Personal Defense, Holsters for Combat and Concealed Carry, The 1911 Automatic Pistol, The Gun Digest Book of Personal Protection and Home Defense, The Shooter’s Guide to the 1911, The Hunter and the Hunted, and The Complete Illustrated Manual of Handgun Skills. His latest book is Dealing with the Great Ammo Shortage. He is also a regular contributor to Gun Tests, American Gunsmith, Small Arms Review, Gun Digest, Concealed Carry Magazine, Knife World, Women and Guns, Handloader and other publications. Bob is well-known for his firearm testing.

More: Choosing a Gun Safe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
My first safe is a winchester 24 gun safe, and i like it very much. While the "24" is very optimistic, the shelving units inside are just gravy. Eventually ill have to redo things internally to allow for more storage, but for now it works
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Whatever you do don't get a electronic keypad. Just check out the YouTube videos on how easy they are to get into. Old school combo for my multi safes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
Whatever you do don't get a electronic keypad. Just check out the YouTube videos on how easy they are to get into. Old school combo for my multi safes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Exactly, they are easy to get into and if they are smashed by a intruder are expensive to replace.

Also, all those bolts going through the side dont mean anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
I have 2 stunningly beautiful gloss black National Security "Magnum 40" safes (the largest and heaviest door and frame safes made. These things are Beautiful!) in the entertainment room and now we need a third! It's not going to be a movie/sound room soon at this rate! My wife says we need to change the name of the room from the entertainment room to the "containment room". :?
I think I should just put an addition onto the house that is just one big room safe! 16' ceilings and all. (I wanted a room just for my African mounts anyway... Now if that money tree I planted in the back would just pop up and start budding...:smile:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,692 Posts
Also unless you are buying a very high quality safe that is fully and properly secured down to the floor/walls all your really doing is slowing down the semi-criminal types regardless of digital/combo locks.. Also know that in the event of a fire unless you have a very high fire rated safe your firearms inside will still need restoration work as they will not come through unaffected the majority of times (learn about how the fire rating works & how the door seals work etc)....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Spilz

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I have a Liberty safe with a S&G digital lock. I can not find a security issue with that lock. I see many on the Sentry safe but not on the S&G digital key pad. Are these easy to get in to? You've got me worried...

Thanks
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
3,283 Posts
:idea:I NEED TO BUY ANOTHER SAFE BUT EVERY TIME I GO TO ORDER ONE I COME HOME WITH A NEW GUN AND NO SAFE:p
Good One..... !
 
  • Like
Reactions: LESTER

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
Don't own one...Never seen the need. But, (alwayz), with the rise of government dependent meth heads...Been thinking of getting one, however, I will not own one with electronics...Don't have much to choose from up here...Still looking. Even with one will not keep all my firearms in it...I will always have one or two stashed around the shack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Something to note for anyone seeking to buy their first safe. Whether its a combo lock or a digital lock make sure you practice unlocking and opening the door on a regular basis. That way if SHTF and you need to gather stuff out of there; muscle memory kicks in when your mind goes blank because the adrenaline is pumping. For a week i practiced running to the safe whenever a preset alarm went off (the times varied) to make sure i can get into the safe and pull a weapon and mag out without much fuss. The first few times i must of looked like a fumbling doof, but now it's goes much smoother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
If I may contribute to this thread, I watched this a few years back and found it pretty informative.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
I'm a big fan of Sturdy Safes for their value and the build quality. I also have a Cannon I bought at Costco that is cheap in comparison to a proper residential safe
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
I just keep all my guns in an old refrigerator box on which I stenciled "Medical Waste: Do Not Eat". No one even comes near it.



But seriously, I have a Fort Knox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Don't own one...Never seen the need.
Why haven't you seen the need?
Probably you are cover by insurance, but how would you feel if one of your tools that was stolen, was use to cause great bodily harm or even death to someone. Maybe even someone you know and love like a family member or a close friend ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
Why haven't you seen the need?
Probably you are cover by insurance, but how would you feel if one of your tools that was stolen, was use to cause great bodily harm or even death to someone. Maybe even someone you know and love like a family member or a close friend ?
Don't live where thieves live... We shoot, shovel & shut-up... No insurance... They don't see da need to insure me... Also, if some pos was to get a case of stupid and come snooping round da shack & not find one home with a load of buckshot waiting for it...well, with the intent to steal... The best safe is only a small deterrent. With that being said, times are changing with da meth head & a progressive government giving them a living... Living up here is hard... Thin da herd so to speak. Still, not that worried about it happening... now, fire is a horse of a different color...lightning can strike, eh... So, I've been looking into them... Not to impressed in what I have seen... I could build far more superior than what I found locally... Still, I would never put all my toyz in one location... I do like: "an old refrigerator box on which I stenciled "Medical Waste: Do Not Eat". No one even comes near it."...akitainu

Seriously, I will be building a vault or purchasing a safe soon... Times are changing...(Have actually thought about locking the doors when I leave da shack... No B.S.)

I have been blessed living some place special...Folks are da salt of da earth...You got your neighbors back they got yours...Times are changing: thankx Big government progs...
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top