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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking into reloading but I am trying to find out what we be the best type of press to start with.

I know most people will say single stage but I want a press that I can grow with over time.

I really like the capabilities of progressive units and the different stations. I am impressed by how much they can speed up reloading time or to process brass. Some of these have the built in swager which looks like a huge benefit. My reloading time will be limited so the more efficiently I can use this "reloading time' the better. 90% of my reloads will be for pinking and punching paper.

Then of course there are the turrets which I know the least about.

I am mainly looking to reload .45 ACP, 9mm, 5.56 and .308/7.62x51 down the road when I get a clue. :?:

I don't have a huge budget but I would rather buy "once and cry once". However, I don't want to waste $$ on something that I don't need or won't use. That money could be used for dies, primers, powder etc.

I have been looking at a few different units Hornady, RCBS & Dillion.
 

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I think dillion is good stuff, but I am no expert, just someone who wants to start reloading too.
 

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I've been asking the same question, with the same needs. Most of my friends are using Dillon 650. Seems to be popular for faster production than the single stage presses. Reloaders chime in!
 

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I would suggest sticking with RCBS or Dillon. Nothing against Hornady, but I think the other guys make better equipment.

I went with a single stage for better consistency, but I'm loading small batches, and I would definitely recommend a progressive setup for higher volume reloading.
 

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I have a hornady single stage and it works great for the money. If I would've had more funds to put towards the setup then I would've gone with a Dillon
 

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Dollar for dollar you get more with the Hornady progressive than the other two. You will want a heavy duty single stage press as well. Turrets get old fast if you load a lot of ammo in a single sitting.

If you don't have the time to do it properly, do not reload.
 

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If you don't have the time to do it properly, do not reload.
This is excellent advice.

I'm not trying to turn anyone away from reloading but never forget this.


I have always wanted and intended to step up into a progressive setup and after using a few different ones that friends have I will one day bite the bullet and go with the Dillon. It's more money but it's the Cadillac of progressives, their no BS warranty is for real.

Now with that, I reload thousands and thousands of rounds every year on my single stage setup and have not yet bought a progressive. I first bought a RCBS single stage and like H&K has said you will want a single stage or at least I think it's a good idea to have, you can use the single stage for test runs or even just small runs of a different caliber without having to go and change out everything in the progressive press. I'd recommend for getting started pick up a good single stage press and grow into the progressive if you feel the need.

The progressive is faster but what your going to find that takes up more of your time is the case prep, that I find in reloading to be the time suck. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't know which to get either the dillon 1050 or 650?
I was looking at both and leaning towards the 650 due to my needs, it's capabilities not to mention cost. However, that 1050 has the swaging deal built in which I hear is the cat's arce.

I also saw some place that RCBS is coming out with a 7 station progressive. It is suppose to be comparable to the 1050 and will have a much better price point. At this time it's vaporware though.
 

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The progressive is faster but what your going to find that takes up more of your time is the case prep, that I find in reloading to be the time suck. :wink:
Exactly. The Nosler brass is well worth the price once you find out how long it takes to properly prep your cases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
This is excellent advice.

I'm not trying to turn anyone away from reloading but never forget this.


I have always wanted and intended to step up into a progressive setup and after using a few different ones that friends have I will one day bite the bullet and go with the Dillon. It's more money but it's the Cadillac of progressives, their no BS warranty is for real.

Now with that, I reload thousands and thousands of rounds every year on my single stage setup and have not yet bought a progressive. I first bought a RCBS single stage and like H&K has said you will want a single stage or at least I think it's a good idea to have, you can use the single stage for test runs or even just small runs of a different caliber without having to go and change out everything in the progressive press. I'd recommend for getting started pick up a good single stage press and grow into the progressive if you feel the need.

The progressive is faster but what your going to find that takes up more of your time is the case prep, that I find in reloading to be the time suck. :wink:
Lifetime on the 650 but only one year on the 1050.....so weird.

I hear the same about the case prep time. Would it be a good idea to have a progressive to use as a brass prep station 90% of the time, then load on the single stage? I know it would be an investment but Just brain storming.

Also I believe the that Dillion has a basic 550 that can be upgraded to a progressive?? Thinking about this idea too.
 

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Hornady w/RCBS dies. Would've gone with Dillon but the LGS carries Hornady & RCBS along with other mfg equipment. I started out with the single stage to get a good idea of how to reload and asked A LOT of questions. Luckily I had friends that knew how to reload and ppl at gun store knew a lot. My opinion, reloading to me is very meticulous, considering you have to inspect everything as far as brass, weights of powder charge, OAL lengths, etc, etc, etc. To me this isn't something you just jump right in to. You're doing the right thing by asking questions and do a lot of research.
 

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I would definitely start with a single stage press and develop a complete an thorough understanding for the process. Redding makes awesome dies. RCBS Rock Chucker press will be tough to beat for the money. If you reload much, you will realize that you will get into two different types of reloading, either volume or custom (eventually you will get into custom). When doing custom loading for a particular rifle (each one has its own likings) you will be working in smaller batchers and utilizing a single stag press during that process (atleast until you have mastered the composition of each particular load). I think it is a good idea to be buying components and have the capacity to reload. If you do much shooting,
 

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I have reloaded for 40+ years. I strongly suggest you start with a turret press, take your time and learn the processes and procedures before going to a progressive setup. You will be much more at ease and able to spot difficulties quickly. Start reading with a Lyman Manual. Get help from others who reload in your area. Once you have mastered the basics, move to a progressive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It seems that there are a lot of pieces of equipment to buy. Dies, powder measures, swager, deprimer, trimmer etc. I don't know where the list begins or ends. Also you have electronic and manual options.
 
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