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Donut Company Likely to Pay Dough, Serve Probation

HOUSTON -- Federal prosecutors say Shipley Do-Nut Flour and Supply Company Inc. pleaded guilty to conspiring to harbor illegal immigrants.

Three former and current managers of the Houston company also pleaded guilty Friday to hiring or continuing to hire illegal aliens.

The case is part of the government's latest crackdown on employers who hire illegal immigrants.

The company pleaded guilty through its president Lawrence Shipley III to conspiring to harbor illegal immigrants.

Sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 19. Shipley Do-Nut faces a maximum fine of $500,000 and up to five years probation then.

The company has agreed to implement new procedures to prevent future violation of federal immigration laws. It will also pay $1.3 million forfeiture to the government.

Shipley Do-Nuts is a baked goods company. It has some 200 franchises across Texas, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee.

http://www.kbtx.com/home/headlines/27961549.html
 

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Probation hell. They need mucho jail time. The penalty must be harsh enough to make companies scared to death of hiring an illegal. These folks plead guilty.
 

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Jeez whats with the Donut guys. We had similar crap here.



NEW HAVEN -- A Guilford man and his daughter pleaded not guilty in federal court Friday to charges they imported illegal workers from Portugal for a string of Dunkin' Donut shops along the shoreline, a setup prosecutors allege made them a fortune on the backs of people coerced into working seven days a week for as little as $250.

Jose Calhelha, 46, of 8 Greenwood Lane, a native of Portugal who retains dual citizenship, sold the 10 franchises last summer, netting about $9 million. But he allegedly built his success by hiring and exploiting possibly hundreds of illegal immigrants, some of whom he enticed to move here from Portugal with a promise of the American dream.

A federal grand jury in Bridgeport on Thursday indicted Calhelha on seven counts, including conspiracy to encourage, harbor and transport aliens; illegally transporting and harboring aliens, and encouraging them to enter the U.S.; hiring undocumented aliens and document fraud.

His daughter, Diana, 22, a college student, was indicted on two counts, charged with helping her father transport the workers, manage their job duties and fill out the fraudulent forms.

The Calhelhas were released Friday after their lawyer, William Dow of New Haven, negotiated strict terms with Assistant U.S. Attorney Krishna R. Patel.

Jose Calhelha will turn over $1.5 million in a cash bond; the title to his Guilford home, on which there is no mortgage and which is worth $2 million or more; and the titles to his 11 cars, worth an estimated $350,000. He will not be allowed to travel outside the state except to Rhode Island and Massachusetts to visit lawyers and an accountant, and must give 24 hours' notice whenever he does so.

He also was ordered to have no contact with any employees of Dunkin' Donuts.

Patel told Judge Joan G. Margolis that Calhelha is a flight risk and a possible danger to the community because he has a history of intimidating his employees. She said Calhelha, who is no longer working in the U.S., has a home and family in Portugal and has traveled there seven times in the past year, usually with only a briefcase in hand.

His home in Guilford was for sale for a time last year. The massive brick mansion is situated in the woods behind an imposing entryway with stone walls and an iron gate, at the end of a cul-de-sac just north of Route 146.

Diana Calhelha was released on $100,000 bail and restricted to travel within New England, New York and New Jersey.

Both are scheduled to appear in court Feb. 28 for jury selection, though an extension to a later date is likely, Margolis said.

"The charges contained in this indictment reveal a brazen disregard for United States immigration, employment and tax laws," U.S. Attorney Kevin J. O'Connor said. He said that the investigation is ongoing and that "anyone who was making money off the backs of these illegal aliens" could be charged. He called the alleged scheme "a well-orchestrated plot to exploit the American dream."

The Calhelhas were arrested at their home Friday morning with the help of Guilford police after an investigation by the U.S. attorney's office and the federal immigration and customs enforcement branch of the Homeland Security Department.

The allegations first surfaced last May in a report by Alan Cohn of WTNH, Channel 8, who investigated after two former employees of Calhelha came forward to tell their story.

O'Connor said workers who came forward will be assisted with work permits and will be allowed to stay in the U.S. He said authorities did not know where the other illegal workers are now. An agent with the immigration service said as far as he knew none had been deported.

Short, stocky and handsome, with neat gray hair tinged with white, Jose Calhelha sat with a calm expression on his face throughout the proceedings Friday. He wore jeans and a gray sweat shirt under a black jacket.

His daughter, dressed in a yellow hooded sweat shirt and gray sweat pants, her brown hair in a ponytail, appeared nervous. Dow repeatedly reassured her with a hand on her back.

Jose Calhelha faces up to 70 years in prison and a fine of up to $1.75 million if convicted on all seven counts. Diana Calhelha would face up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $500,000 if convicted on all counts.

From at least 2002 until he sold the stores last July, Calhelha and others allegedly recruited people from Portugal to work at his doughnut shops in Branford, Derby, East Haven, Old Saybrook and Westbrook, the indictment alleges.

Calhelha promised the illegal workers certain positions, salary and benefits, paid their airfare to the United States and put them up in his home and at an apartment in Branford, the indictment states. But the immigrants soon found themselves working 85 or more hours a week for as little as $1,000 a month.

Calhelha put them to work without the required paperwork and drove them to the work sites. In addition to long hours at Dunkin' Donuts, Calhelha required his workers to perform other jobs such as painting, landscaping and snow removal at the stores and at his residence, according to the indictment.

The U.S. attorney said Calhelha deducted payments for room and board and "attorneys fees" from their salaries. And, although he initially paid the workers in cash, the indictment says, he later paid them with fraudulent checks made out to other people.

The indictment also alleges Calhelha sold the workers fraudulent identity documents, and filled out fraudulent employment and tax forms for them.

Some of the people recruited from Portugal worked as managers and were told by Calhelha not to employ "Americans," the indictment states. O'Connor said more than half of the people employed at Calhelha's shops were illegal immigrants - a number he guessed to be at least 150, possibly in the hundreds. Calhelha cheated some of those workers out of regular and overtime pay, the indictment alleges.[/size]
 

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I dunno if you guys have ever heard of Maddox. He runs a website called The Best Page In The Universe. Most of his content is full of comedic satire topped with copious quantities of hilarious truth.

One post he has is about a class action lawsuit against Walmart for hiring illegal immigrants. Maddox concludes with a single principle that would end illegal immigration forever. I don't want to give it away so feel free to read it for yourselves here.
 

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I think Maddox hit the nail on the head right there. That's the unfortunate consequence of living in a free market society. One more reason to continue to improve yourself through education and hard work.
 

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Wow..... :lol: :roll:
 
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