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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Some of you are aware that there is an issue about the A5M and A5M-XP with the McMillan stock that has some of us end users pretty miffed. Those of us who want to run a bi-pod on the McMillan stock have discovered that without modifications to the stock, there is not a second attachment point to bolt the bi-pod rail onto the stock. I wanted to use the Seekins Precision SRS 3" rail which is made specifically for the McMillan Fiberglass stocks for my QD bi-pod mounting but discovered that I can only attach the SRS using the sling swivel stud attachment point as one attachment point but that there is no way to utilize the sling swivel cup that sits directly under the second hole of the Seekins SRS rail without the modification to the stock between the barrel and the cup, which means that I have to drill the stock to insert a T-Nut under the sling attachment cup. Further to get to the area on the stock to place the T-Nut, my brand new FNH SPR A5M-XP has to be taken apart.

The relevant thread that started this discussion and modification project is located here: http://fnforum.net/forums/fn-bolt-action-rifles/49982-spr-a5m-xp.html

If you the reader of this thread want to get to the meat of the matter about how to do this modification without the back story or my reasoning for doing (not wanting to do this), click on the following links to get directly to the "How To" part of this thread. You won't be disappointed as there is a lot of information, instructions, and pictures. Lots and lots of pictures as a matter of fact. Pictures are worth a thousand words each and it is easier to show someone something then it is to explain something to someone.

PART I: DIS-ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE FNH SPR A5M-XP - HERE

PART II: MODIFYING THE MCMILLAN STOCK TO ACCEPT THE T-NUT - HERE

PART III: RE-ASSEMBLY OF THE FNH SPR A5M-XP POST T-NUT INSTALLATION - HERE

I do not think that there is a single person that has this issue that is not miffed (or at least mildly surprised) at both FNH and McMillan for this obvious oversight, or at least what I consider to be an oversight. I think (as some others do) that for a $2500 top of the line bolt action Special Police Rifle, this should have been addressed in the R&D phase. It is very discouraging to say the least that I spent this amount of money on one of the top of the line FN SPR's and even before I took it out of the box, I knew that I had some work to do to "fix" what should have been a non issue in the first place.

In my opinion it was very short sighted of both parties involved. I spoke with both FNH and McMillan about this and one blamed the other who in turn blamed the other. However, McMillan does have a solution and they will modify my stock for me after I send it to them for a price of about $55 plus shipping (2014 price), or I can mod the stock myself IF I have the ability and tools to do it. There is always the option to let a local gunsmith do it but I suspect the price will be the same or even more than what McMillan charges. If I have the ability but not the tools, I am going to have to buy the tools. Likewise, if I have the tools but do not have the ability, I'm left "out in the cold" and I am going to require some help. Either way, it is going to cost me money to correct this issue unless I have both the ability and the tools already. Luckily for me, I have both the ability and the tools and then some. That is not a pat on the back for me, it is the truth however. Now McMillan, after some discussion with them about what I consider a major deficiency, provided me with a T-Nut that needed to be embedded into the stock after the stock was drilled a couple of different ways to accept the T-Nut. It was nice that they sent me the T-Nut for free, but I could have bought one at my local hardware store or Home Depot for about 25 cents. Yup, that's right, 25 cents. I was still not convinced that this was the route that I wanted to go down though because of the potential problems that could arise resulting in me having to purchase a whole new stock if I screwed the pooch, so to say.

Not wanting to drill my stock at first, I was contemplating some type of spring loaded expanding fitting that would fit in the sling attachment cup, locking into the cup ring with the ability to accept the rail bolt. The biggest issue on this was how to ensure that the nut or expanding nut or whatever I could design, manufacture, and implement would actually hold the rail with sufficient resistance. If it didn't and popped out of the cup in the fiberglass stock it might damaged the front swivel attachment point that was being used, or damaged the cup, or even damage the fiberglass stock. It could also damage the rail that was to hold the bi-pod. I know that there are bi-pods out there that can use the single sling swivel stud to attach to, but that would require me to make another purchase of a different attachment method or even a different bi-pod and I did not want to go down that road because I had already decided that I wanted a QD bi-pod, thus I needed the rail for the specific bi-pod that I had already purchased. The bi-pod I had already bought was a safe queen and was about 25% off of retail so when you talk about a bi-pod that can cost more than $200, it was a substantial savings for me. There are other options as well but none of them fit what I envisioned to be my premiere bolt action rifle, and dare I say it, what others envisioned for their rifles as well. Ask just about anyone who runs into this problem and there are going to wince at the prospect of having to correct this obvious shortfall. This is probably the most expensive rifle that I will ever purchase unless I hit the numbers rights and get myself the Tracking Point sniper rifle at a cost of a cool $22,000. Right.....like I am going to try to swing that one by the wife with a straight face. Duke Nukem would be proud of this selection though. I really do not want the wife tap dancing on my head over a $22,000 firearm purchase, so yes, the FNH SPR A5M-XP is probably "the" bolt action long range rifle for me for the remainder of my lifetime.

But in reality, the issue that would aggravate me the most about doing this modification is that I would have to un-bed the factory spot bedded action to get this accomplished. I know that it is only spot bedded instead of having a full bedding but that really is not the issue. I don't care what anyone says, a lifetime of experience has taught me that once you take something apart, it will never go back together the same. Now I am going to have to take the rifle apart to do this mod because I don't have the time or the money for sufficient R&D to come up with an alternative. If I did, I could probably afford the Tracking Point so this would not be an issue at all. Hell, for all I know someone has already figured this out and I am just not smart or wise enough to type the words in proper order for the Google query to lead me to the solution.

So after 8 months of having a $2500 plus some more $$$ safe queen, and almost 18 months after I bought the scope and related parts that I wanted, I decided today that I am going to have to do the unwanted and dismantle my premiere rifle to modify the stock or just dump the idea of having a QD bi-pod and use sand bags. But those sand bags are really heavy to carry around and with my bad back, I would have to buy a motorized hand truck to move the bags which in reality is more work than I want to get involved with at my age. Maybe I should just hire a (wo)man servant and have her do all the work. She can haul all the stuff around, do all the shooting, and I can sit in the hot Florida shade while being fanned, drinking tropical drinks and take credit for her excellent marksmanship. And on top of that, I get to gaze at the luscious curvatures of her body during this entire time. Try swinging the one by the wife. That Tracking Point is looking more affordable after all.

Well, it's off to the re-loading bench then the shop to do what has to be done. Don't get me wrong, I love doing this kind of stuff. I just really really really hate dismantling my brand new long range shooter before I even put a single projectile down the pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
These are the steps and methods that I utilized to disassemble the FNH SPR A5M-XP and drill the McMillan Fiberglass stock for installation of the T-Nut, and the re-assembly instructions to put rifle back together. Many pictures are included to show the progress. I have to disassemble the rifle. There is not other way to do it that I know of. At least I won't have to tear it down more than about 60% leaving the trigger group, the rail, the bolt, the barrel and action assembly, and the Tactical Box Magazine (TBM) alone as dis-assembly of these items is not warranted (except for removal from the stock) to do what you need to do. I would not want to mess around with the barrel and action assembly nor would I want to dismantle the trigger group even though I know that I could do the trigger group if I had to.

PART I: DIS-ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE FNH SPR A5M-XP:


Step 1: Following prescribed firearm practices, I made sure that the firearm was unloaded and I remove the magazine from the Tactical Box Magazine (TBM) well. I then prepare a work place. I am doing the dis-assembly and eventually the re-assembly on my reloading bench but the actual drilling is going to be done in my shop. I used my trusty AR15 mat as a cushion on the re-loading bench and then placed a folded towel on the mat for additional protection of the firearm and parts. If I scratch some of the parts, it would make today a bad day from the get go. One thing that I have going for me is that my rifle is "New In Box" as it came from FNH's factory, so there are no "extras" on it like scope rings and the such as of yet.

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Step 2: This is the bolt removal stage. However, others that may utilize these instruction might have to remove additional after market items that were added onto the rail such as a scope and the rings as well as any other peripherals that have been mounted on the rail section of the firearm. This will become clear later why the removal is warranted. I am going to set these items aside and out of the way as I disassemble them to keep the work area as uncluttered as possible. Based on the instruction that I read, the bolt has to be cocked prior to being removed. Now the safety lever must be placed in the "intermediate position" so that I can raise the bolt handle and draw the bolt fully to the rear of the action while depressing the bolt stop located at the left rear of the receiver. This will allow the removal of the bolt. I found these instructions on page 12 of the FNH SPR Generic Manual. They do not have a manual specific to the A5M-XP and the generic SPR manual is not optimal for the firearm in question but it will do in a pinch. I then set the bolt out of the way to protect it from myself.

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Step 3: I then removed the cheek riser. This is done by removing the knurled tensioning bolt of the riser and lifting the riser out of the stock. This knurled tensioning bolt can be installed on either side of the stock so it is ambidextrous for both right and left handed shooters. Mine is set for a right handed shooter so it is on the right side of the stock. There is a spacer that is painted red and a clamping nut that is black (both are square) that slide into the clamp slot within the stock, one on each side of the clamping mechanism itself, that allows the knurled adjusting screw to clamp the riser into place. The spacer and nut are loose and will come out once the rifle stock is turned over so I need to be prepared to catch them as I turn the rifle over. I think that I am going to remove them at this stage using a pair of needle nose pliers or a pair of hemostats. There are no instructions in the FN SPR Manual on how to do this but it is self evident to me. I will set the riser, knurled tensioning bolt, and spacer along with the tensioning nut out of the way. As an aside, I was highly disappointed during the examination of the under side of the Cheek Riser (the part that you can not see when installed on the stock), as the finish has failed, and failed miserably. There are large chips of finish and cracks in the finish in many places. There is also either a crack or a scratch in the aluminum (if that is what was the material used in the construction of this part is) and this will definitely have to be addressed by FNH or McMillan. So I will have to call them for resolution of this newly discovered deficiency.

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Step 4: Next comes the removal the Adjustable Length of Pull spacers on the rear of the stock. This is not necessary but I think (and later found out) that it makes it easier to handle the stock for working purposes and makes the Adjustable Length of Pull less likely to be damaged when working on it. I did this by removing the two 5/32" Allen wrench (hexed key) screws on the rear of the stock. They are embedded into the rubber shoulder pad so they are not visible unless I was directly looking at them from the rear of the stock. There are small holes in the rubber shoulder pad to allow access to the heads of these two screws using the Allen wrenches. There are no instructions in the FN SPR Manual on how to do this but it is self evident. I then set the Adjustable Length of Pull spacers and rubber shoulder pad and screws out of the way.

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Step 5: I decided that the next step was to flip the firearm over and set it down on the bench cushion utilizing the rail as the anti tipping method which is why I recommended removing the scope and other items from the rail if doing this modification. Using the rail is a method of keeping the firearm upside down and stabilized. I had already removed the Cheek Riser spacer and nut from the stock so if someone else is using these instructions and did not removed the spacer and tensioning nut from the stock when they removed the cheek riser, these two parts will slide out now so be prepared to catch them so you do not lose them. Once I flipped the firearm over, it allowed me to gain access to the underside of the firearm which exposes the two action screws that attaches the Trigger Guard/Magazine Well Assembly to the action through holes in the stock. They are Allen keyed (hex keyed) and are removed with a 5/32" Allen wrench. These bolts have thread lock on them and are torqued to 65 in/lbs according the the FN SPR Gun Record Book which records maintenance preformed and has a fired round count log. There are two lengths of these action screws and the short one goes towards the muzzle end of the firearm while the longer one sits directly behind the trigger guard. There are no instructions in the FN SPR Manual on how to do this as this is way beyond the scope of cleaning the firearm and I was now in the armorers arena of firearm servicing. Once I remove these two screws, I was able to remove the Trigger Guard/Magazine Well Assembly that houses the Tactical Box Magazine (TBM) and I placed these items out of the way. As an aside, it was noted that these two screws are the only attachment points that sandwich the McMillan stock between the "upper" and "lower" parts of the firearm.

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Step 6: I then decided to remove the Swivel Sling Stud on the underside front of the McMillan Stock. I did this using a drift punch passed through the hole in the stud to loosen the stud then unscrewed the stud. It came off of the threaded T-Nut that is embedded into the stock at the front of the McMillan stock. I always keep firearm parts regardless of whether I will ever need them again and it is my choice to keep the stud instead of throwing it away. It is not going to be used in this "upgrade" that I will be doing but I am a stickler for making sure that all the parts that came with the (any) firearm are kept in case I want to part with the firearm later on (highly unlikely) but I am going to save the Swivel Sling Stud. There are no instructions in the FN SPR Manual on how to remove the Swivel Sling Stud but it is self evident. I set the Sling Swivel Stud out of the way and will later find a place to store it.

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Step 7:I will now separate the barrel, action, and trigger unit from the stock. I always keep in mind that this stock is spot bedded to the action so the barrel is not (should not be) touching the stock at any point along its length. The only contact points are supposed to be right behind the action and right in front of the action. I very carefully lifted the barrel and action unit up and out keeping in mind to make sure that it was lifted out perpendicular to the stock or else I could run the risk of damaging the bedding material and if that happens, I will have to re-bed the action after some massive clean up to remove the old bedding material around the action. Some people have mentioned in related threads on the internet that they want to fully bed the action but considering these rifles are sub MOA shooters with just the action spot bedded, this is not something that I want to explore at this time. Maybe later if "the" human behind the rifle can warrant this to tighten up the groupings. But I know that if the shooter (me) does my part, then the rifle will do its part and further bedding will most likely not be required. I took this opportunity to verify that the trigger adjustment screw is secured in place with some type of removable bonding agent. I also will take this opportunity to document the serial number (part number??) of the action located on the underside of the action. I will write this information into the SPR owners manual on the first page where the serial number information is located. I also will take this opportunity to examine the barrel, action, trigger group, and stock for any deficiencies and take the appropriate action necessary to remedy any issues that raise concerns. There are no instructions in the FN SPR Manual on how to separate the barrel and action from the magazine well assembly. I set the barrel and action combo along with the McMillan stock out of the way.

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Here are some additional pictures for the dis-mantled rifle.

Trigger mechanism. I will pay special attention to insure that the bonding agent used to lock the adjustment screw that adjust the weight of the trigger pull is intact.

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Front underside of the action showing either the part number or the serial number of the action.

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Rear action spot bedding material and the area around the top of the McMillan Stock.

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Front action spot bedding material and the area around the top of the McMillan Stock.

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The McMillan stock nearly completely dis-mantled. There are still things left on the stock that I do not want to mess with such as the interface on the butt of the stock and the Length of Pull spacers, the Sling Swivel Stud T-Nut that is epoxied in place, and the Cheek Riser clamping mechanism that is firmly entrenched into the stock. I feel that if I mess with any of these items, I will run the possibility that I will permanently damage the McMillan stock which would result in a cost to replace the entire stock. I feel that these things fall under the category of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" or "if I don't need to do this to accomplish the end goal, then I shouldn't".

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I am now ready to do the stock modification which I will cover in Part II: Modifying the McMillan Stock to Accept the T-Nut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Now that I have the stock removed from the firearm, I am able to get to the meat of the matter and that is modifying the stock to accept the T-Nut. I have all the tools necessary to do this so for me it is a no brain-er to do it instead of spending the $55.00 plus shipping to have the McMillan people in Phoenix do it for me. I will also have to deal with the down time that the stock is being worked on and I hate firearm parts hanging around on the bench waiting to be used. So on to a list of tools that I will use. I need two drill bits, a 5mm and a 15/64". I will also use a Forstner drill bit that measured 3/4" ( Diablo 3/4 in. High-Speed Steel Forstner Bit-FB-005 - The Home Depot ) to make the recess cut. Some clamps to hold the stock to the mini mill or drill press and some wood for cushioning the clamping of parts. I also will use epoxy to set the T-Nut, some thread lock (Permatex medium strength blue that is service removable) and some black liquid tape.

I can use a hand held electric drill but I will have to utilize great care to keep the cut perpendicular to the stock base or else I will wind up with a screw that is off center resulting in a bad attachment point, uneven stress on the stock, and a poorly fitting Seekins SRS rail for my QD bi-pod. The stock does get thicker as you go down the length, but the bottom of the stock is flat and remains flat forward of the TBM well so the increase in height of the stock is a non issue. I DO NOT RECOMMEND THE USE OF A PADDLE DRILL BIT FOR THIS APPLICATION BECAUSE IT WILL PROBABLY WIND UP MARRING THE STOCK, AND ALSO RESULT IN AN ILL FITTING T-NUT, AND AN OFF CENTER ATTACHMENT SCREW WHICH MAY RESULT IN A POOR FIT OF THE SEEKINS RAIL TO THE STOCK. So as a result of the possibility of these things happening, I am going to use my recently purchased Mini Mill that has the three axis table on it to make the recess cut. I could use my shop drill press with the table, but I have been dying to use my Mini Mill for some time and now is as good a time as ever to use it.

PART II: MODIFYING THE MCMILLAN STOCK TO ACCEPT THE T-NUT:

Step 1: With the stock clamped barrel side down to my mini mill table which has three axis of travel, I am going to locate the center of the Sling Swivel Cup on the front bottom of the stock and drill a 5mm hole through the stock. The attachment bolt that Seekins is providing with the rail is 4.7mm so .3mm of wiggle room is just about right. The Sling Swivel Cup is concave on the bottom so it is going to be easy to initially line up the stock to the mill head by using the concave bottom and inserting the drill bit with the mill off. This will allow me to get an accurate centering of the drill bit in the Sling Swivel Cup. This hole is just for centering purposes but I want it large enough to allow the Seekins SRS rail bolt to be inserted into the hole with just a little bit of wiggle room. Later on, I will drill the hole larger to accept the shaft of the T-Nut.

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Step 2: I then will flip the stock over so that the barrel side of the stock is facing up and the flat side of the stock is against the mini mill table and then I will secure it to the table using the clamps and wood spacers. I know that the mini mill is less than .001" off of perpendicular to the table in both the X and Y axis because I have spent many hours aligning and upgrading the mini mill for precision work. It is after all the unit that I will be using for another one of my projects, milling an 80% lower. I am going to center the hole by using the drill bit inserted into the previously drilled 5mm hole to ensure that the next step is be done as accurately. I could use a "wiggler" which I have to align the hole but this is not a piece of work requiring that much precision so it is not necessary to go into that amount of set up work. This step of drilling the T-Nut recess entails using the 3/4" Forstner's bit to drill the recess. I will drill the recess for the T-Nut "eye-balling" the depth to near equal in depth to the T-Nut recess for the Sling Swivel Stud. I will have to be careful that I do not drill too deep or else I will hit the underside of the Sling Swivel Cup which is made of metal and is embedded into the stock, which will also result in my loosing the centering hole. If I hit the metal cup, I can potentially damage the stock beyond repair.

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Step 3: Now that the recess T-Nut 3/4" hole is drilled, I am going to test fit the T-Nut. Because the T-Nut thread shaft is larger than the centering hole, I can not insert the T-Nut fully into the hole. Now I am going to enlarge the centering hole to accept the diameter of the thread shaft of the T-Nut so I will use a 15/64" drill bit to enlarge the original 5mm centering or "pilot" hole. This should result in a perfect fit of the T-Nut into the recess cut in the stock.

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Step 4: I will now remove the clamps holding the stock to the table of the mini mill (no more drilling is required) and I will turn the stock over again so that I can test fit the alignment of the Seekins SRS rail bolt. I will do this by slightly pushing the "prongs" of the T-Nut into the stock recess that I just drilled and then attach the bolt to the T-Nut from the Sling Swivel Cup side to verify the bolt alignment is in the center of the Sling Swivel Cup.

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Here is another picture to show the alignment check of the Seekins SRS rail bolt.

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Step 5: The next step that I am going to do is to remove the Seeking SRS rail bolt from the Sling Swivel Cup side of the stock and thread it into the T-Nut from the barrel side of the stock which will allow me to pull the T-Nut out of the recessed hole for bonding. Before I do this though I want to mark the orientation of the T-Nut so that when I epoxy it, the "prong" holes that are now in the stock will line up and I will be assured that the rail bolt will remain centered in the Swivel Sling Cup when re-installed later on. I marked the T-Nut by using a sharpie and placing two black dots, one on the stock T-Nut recess hole and the other on the T-Nut itself. It probably would have not made a difference if the T-Nut was rotated 120 degrees but why take a chance that the alignment that I worked so diligently to achieve might be lost.

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Step 6: My next step will be to do a test fit of the Seekins SRS Rail to insure that there are no alignment issues prior to securing the T-Nut into the recess with epoxy. I will do this by "eye-balling" the Sling Swivel Cup hole to align the rail and attach the front of the Seekins SRS Rail to the Sling Swivel Stud T-Nut. This way I can check the alignment from both sides of the stock. It is a "make me feel better" step because I already know that the bolt alignment will be centered based on previous fittings but I want to make sure that the Seekins SRS Rail will have the required fit. If I epoxy the T-Nut without the test fit of the rail and the alignment is off for the front bolt, I will not be able to correct this without risking damage to the fiberglass stock where the T-Nut will be bonded to the stock. The Seekins SRS Rail does have an elongated front slot for the bolt so there is the ability to move the rail back and forward about 1/4 inch to maintain the alignment.

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Step 7: With the alignment verified, I will remove the Seekins SRS Rail and place it nearby. I will flip the stock over again so I am looking at the "barrel" side of the stock. I will now mix a small batch of epoxy to use to bond the T-Nut into the recess cut of the McMillan stock. I am going to make sure that I have all the parts that I need immediately at hand because I know that I will have a very limited time to set the T-Nut in the epoxy and I can not spend this time looking for parts. WARNING: The epoxy that I will utilize for setting the T-Nut is "quick setting" so I will have 4 minutes of useful working life once the epoxy is mixed. Everything that I need to do must be accomplished within the 4 minutes of the epoxy working life. If you are using this guide for the same purpose and you can not or are not sure that you can do this in 4 minutes or less, I suggest that you utilize a slower setting epoxy or adhesive so that you will have more working time to accomplish the task at hand. Make sure that you have the Seekins SRS Rail, both rail bolts, the T-Nut with one of the bolts inserted on the false side for handling, the epoxy, and the Allen wrench (hex key) at hand so that you do not have to search for any of these items and lose some of the valuable working lifetime of the epoxy.

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Step 8: I will now apply the mixed epoxy in sufficient quantity to bond the T-Nut to the McMillan Stock. I also want a sufficient quantity of the epoxy to "bleed out" of the cut outs of the T-Nut where the metal was folded down to make the three "prongs" that will be embedded into the stock. It is important that I do not use too much epoxy or else I will risk the possibility that the epoxy will bleed into the T-Nut shaft bolt threads and prevent the threading of the bolt or even bonding the bolt to the threads which will result in a permanent bond of the bolt to the T-Nut. I want to avoid this so that if I ever want to remove the rail from the stock I can do so with no issues. If the bolt does get bonded and then I try to remove it at a later time, the T-Nut may (will probably) damage the McMillan Stock which may require some in-depth repair. After I place the proper amount of epoxy in the drilled recess and being careful NOT to get any of the epoxy into the Sling Swivel Cup, I will use the Seekins SRS Rail bolt that I have previously threaded into the false side of the T-Nut, and using the black dots for proper alignment, I will place the T-Nut into the recess holding the bolt between my fingers to that I do not get any of the epoxy on my fingers and then transfer it to stock.

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Step 9: Now that the T-Nut is inserted into the drilled recess I will remove the rail bolt from the false side of the T-Nut and I will flip the McMillan stock over to allow access to the bottom of the stock. I will now place the Seekins SRS Rail into proper position and will install both rail bolts threading them as far as I can with my fingers. Then the innermost bolt (Sling Swivel Cup bolt) will be tightened resulting in the T-Nut being "drawn" into the stock. This will displace the excess epoxy around the three "prong" cut outs. I will now make the final alignment of the rail and alternate the tightening of the rail bolts sufficiently to ensure that the T-Nut is drawn into the stock completely.

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Step 10: With the new T-Nut firmly in place into the stock, I will remove the Seekins SRS Rail bolts and flip the McMillan stock. I will examine the area around the T-Nut for sufficient epoxy "bleed out" from the "prong" cut outs and use a small disposable piece of wood to spread the epoxy around the cut outs to make sure that there is overlapping bonding material which will ensure a good bond of the T-Nut to the stock. The epoxy will be allowed to completely set which will result in a permanent attachment of the T-Nut into the McMillan stock.

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Step 11: Allowing for sufficient time to elapse to ensure that the epoxy will bond with the T-Nut (I'll give it 1 hour), the Seekins SRS Rail will again be aligned and placed into position on the underside of the stock. The rail bolts will be inserted after I apply a small amount of thread lock to the bolt threads and then will tighten the bolts using a 5/32" Allen wrench. The stock is going to be placed aside overnight to allow for the complete bonding of both the epoxy and the thread lock.

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Step 12: After overnight setting of the bonding agents, I will clean the area around both of the bonded T-Nut recesses to make sure that there are no contact points of any epoxy "blobs" against the barrel of the rifle when I re-assemble the rifle. If there are, these "blobs" if sufficiently large enough, will defeat the entire purpose of having a spot bedded action by allowing contact between the rifle barrel and the stock. I will apply some liquid tape to protect the integrity of the now exposed areas of the McMillan stock where the recess cut was made. This will also provide a water resistant seal around the recessed T-Nuts.

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Now that the drilling of the McMillan Stock and the installation of the T-Nut into the recessed slot is finished, the rifle is now ready for Part III: Re-assembly of the FNH SPR A5M-XP Post T-Nut Stock Modification.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Now that my FNH SPR A5M-XP has been dis-assembled and the McMillan Stock has been modified with the T-Nut for installation of the Seekins SRS 3" Rail for the QD bi-pod, it is time for me to re-assemble the rifle. This is a good time for me to make sure that all the parts are free of dirt and that mechanical areas that are not usually available for access are lubricated with a quality lubricant. It is also IMPERATIVE that the spot bedding attachment points at both the front and rear of the action are clean, dirt free, and in good condition. Any dirt or damage to these two spot bedding points has to be removed and/or repaired prior to the rifle being re-assembled. The re-assembly procedure of the rifle that I am going to use are slightly different from the dis-assembly procedure that I used as I am going to assemble the Length of Pull back onto the McMillan Stock before I do anything else. Otherwise than that, the re-assembly is almost identical to the dis-assembly procedures. The reason for the LoP first is to protect the bottom of the stock at the rear of the stock from potential damage as there is no rubber pad to absorb the potential shock that may impact the back bottom of the stock.

PART III: RE-ASSEMBLY OF THE FNH SPR A5M-XP POST T-NUT INSTALLATION.

Step 1: As I indicated, I am going to assemble the Length of Pull spacers and attach them to the McMillan stock using the two screws and the 5/32" Allen wrench (hex key).

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Step 2: The next thing I am going to do is to install the bi-pod on the newly attached Seekins SRS Rail. This will allow for more stability of the stock as the rest of the rifle is re-assembled.

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Step 3: I will now examined the action for any foreign materials and I will lubricated the trigger mechanisms. This may be the only opportunity that I have to do this unless I dis-assemble the rifle again at a later date. I am going to make sure that the underside of the action where it sits in the two spot bedding areas are clean and contain no foreign matter and are in working condition. If not, then the spot bedding is not going to be of any use and the accuracy of the rifle will change with each shot.

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Step 4: Using a pair of wicks (hand glove inserts) to keep the oil from my hands off of the underside of the barrel and action assembly, I will re-assemble the barrel and action assembly to the McMillan stock by inserting the barrel and action assembly into the stock from the top. I have to be extremely careful that I will not fracture or damage the two spot bedding areas.

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Step 5: Next, I will turn the rifle over and sit the rifle on the top rail so that I can have access to the underside of the firearm. I was careful that the barrel and action assembly did not fall out, displace itself, or wiggle back and forth which could damage the spot bedding points where the barrel and action assembly sit into the McMillan Stock. I got the rifle set up on the rail as steady as I could.

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Step 6: I will now inserted the Trigger Guard/Magazine Well Assembly onto/into the bottom of the barrel and action assembly and lined it up to receive the two bolts that will hold the assemblies together in place. I have to remember that the small bolt goes into the front of the magazine assembly and the large bolt goes into the trigger guard on the back of the assembly. I will apply a light coat of removable thread lock to the bottom half of the threads of the two Trigger Guard/Magazine Well Assembly bolts. I will tighten the bolts using a in-lb Torque Wrench to a value of 65 in-lbs as indicated in the FN SPR A5M-XP's Gun Record Book. This book also has the head-space measurement which is great to have because I reload my own ammunition. I will tighten the bolts in stages going from back to front several times to ensure that the barrel and action assembly will sit into the spot bedding evenly and have an even pressure at both points.

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Step 7: Inserting the Cheek Riser spacer (mine is red) and nut into the appropriate slots in the Cheek Riser clamp in the stock in preparation for the knurled tensioning bolt comes next. I will make sure that the spacer is on the side that the knurled tensioning bolt will first pass through. This is because I am a right handed shooter and I want the knurled tensioning bolt facing away from my face when I fire the rifle. So I put the spacer on the right side of the Cheek Riser clamp inside the stock and the tensioning nut on the left side of the Cheek Riser clamp. For left handed shooters, the reverse is needed. I will then insert the Cheek Riser into the Cheek Riser clamp in the stock and thread the knurled tensioning bolt to secure the Cheek Riser. The Cheek Riser will be adjusted by me for proper height at the range when I go to fire my rifle.

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
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Step 8: Next I will insert the bolt into the action and the Tactical Box Magazine (TBM) into the Magazine Well Assembly and will do a function check of the firearm to ensure everything is working properly. Unfortunately, I do not have a snap cap for the .308 and I am very cautious about letting the hammer (firing pin in the bolt) drop on an empty chamber so the full function check will have to wait for now. I will still do a partial one now though.

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Step 9: Now if I assembled this right, I should have only 1 (one) piece left, that being the Swivel Sling Stud that I removed to put the Seekins SRS Rail on the firearm stock. If I have more than one (1) part left, I made a mistake and I need to find the error and correct it. Lucky for me, there is only the one piece left, the Swivel Sling Stud.

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Step 10: Now it's time to drool over my accomplishments. I hope that this guide may help some others that are contemplating this McMillan Stock T-Nut modification.

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Now that I have the issue with the Seekins SRS Rail resolved and my bi-pod is now attached to the FNH SPR A5M-XP, I can now take the remainder of the parts that have been sitting on the shelf, ie, my Vortex Viper PST-624-F1-M, my Badger Ordnance scope rings, and various other sundries and install them on the FNH SPR A5M-XP.

And because I mentioned it, here is the picture of my mini mill that I used in my shop to do the modification.

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Damn man... If everyone, literally has to go through all this... I think we need FNH to grab the hair still somehow on their heads shoved so far up their assess, they need to do a gentle recall on fix this damn problem. I want an ASM, but after this... I'm not sure

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Thanks for the detailed and informative thread!


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"One cannot awaken a man who pretends to be asleep."
 

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Damn man... If everyone, literally has to go through all this... I think we need FNH to grab the hair still somehow on their heads shoved so far up their assess, they need to do a gentle recall on fix this damn problem. I want an ASM, but after this... I'm not sure

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It's really not bad. I did mine with a hand drill. Probably took me 10 minutes in total to get it completed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
When you get down to it, the actual process is very simple. The tear down and rebuild was of greater concern for me that the actual modification. This was meant to be a detailed instructional post for those that are willing to go for it, who have never attempted this type of modification before, as it hopefully answers all the questions that may come up. I was trying to cover all the bases instead of just posting a couple of pictures of "see, drill here and glue and you are done", which is basically what it comes out to be.

It is not a daunting task at all, nor is it very precision work, but the post does provide all the necessary information that must be known prior to undertaking the task.
 

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Great how to post!!!

Nice job. :?
 
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