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Most of the firearms I've uses are SA/DA. I've never fully understood why someone would want an DAO or SAO only firearm.

Can someone explain?

Perhaps give real world examples?

FM
 

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Most of the firearms I've uses are SA/DA. I've never fully understood why someone would want an DAO or SAO only firearm.

Can someone explain?

Perhaps give real world examples?

FM
Most people who choose a DAO are in security, law enforcement etc. where public safety is of a major concern. Trigger pull is longer and heavier. Demands more training and usage to master well as far as I am concerned. Unfortunately the AVERAGE L.E.O doesn't put in as much time with his weapons as he/she should.

SAO is most like a 1911 style action, where you have to manual cock it for the 1st shot. Or do the classic cocked and locked, hammer back safety on. Does allow for a much shorter trigger pull for the 1st rd. Also popular with private security companies (excutives, public figures and diplomats)where speed and readiness is more important vs. safety.

I perfer my DA/SA w/ decocker myself which to me blends the above nicely. Fresh mag comes out SA w/follow ups all SA, carry is DA with no safety to fumble with in a stressful moment.
 

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DA/SA

Nicely put Texas!! :D
 

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Most of my handguns are DA/SA. SIGS, Walther P99's, FNP9, CZ75 SP-01, etc.

I do own guns that are SAO and DAO but I prefer the DA/SA action especially for a carry gun.
 

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When you say DAO is primarily for safety reasons, I think that depends on the type of DAO. Glock and M&P are DAO, but with trigger weights of 5.5 lbs or less. The DA in a DA/SA is usually 10 lbs. or heavier. So the Glock action DAO is closer in feel to a SA than the traditional weight of a DA pistol or revolver. The travel is a little longer than a cocked SA, but considerably less than a traditional DA.

The Glock and M&P type triggers have the advantage of a relatively light DA trigger that is the same for every shot. The DA/SA triggers require transition from the long heavy pull of the DA to the shorter, lighter pull of the SA.

Personally, I feel like my FNP DA/SA when decocked is safer than my Glock or M&P because the FNP's first trigger pull is longer and heavier and therefore harder to AD. None will fire unless you pull the trigger, so all should be safe if you are.
 

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Fabius said:
None will fire unless you pull the trigger, so all should be safe if you are.
That's the key right there. I prefer SAO or guns I can preload the striker for SA on the first shot (FN SAO, 1911, HK USP, Walther P99 AS), but it comes down to individual preference and how each trigger system (and more importantly, each gun) feels and operates in your hands.
 

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When you say DAO is primarily for safety reasons, I think that depends on the type of DAO. Glock and M&P are DAO, but with trigger weights of 5.5 lbs or less. The DA in a DA/SA is usually 10 lbs. or heavier. So the Glock action DAO is closer in feel to a SA than the traditional weight of a DA pistol or revolver. The travel is a little longer than a cocked SA, but considerably less than a traditional DA.

The Glock and M&P type triggers have the advantage of a relatively light DA trigger that is the same for every shot. The DA/SA triggers require transition from the long heavy pull of the DA to the shorter, lighter pull of the SA.

Personally, I feel like my FNP DA/SA when decocked is safer than my Glock or M&P because the FNP's first trigger pull is longer and heavier and therefore harder to AD. None will fire unless you pull the trigger, so all should be safe if you are.
The orginal design concept of the DAO WAS safety reasons, plain and simple. Police Dept.'s exspecially sought these out as the trigger pull required is much longer and deliberate, cutting down on wrongful shootings suits. DAO is primarily a safety design and will remain so no matter what poundage is required to cause the trigger to "break" and fire the round. Trigger disconnect weights have nothing to do with length of pull, and Glock's isnt exactly short. The Glock argument can also be reversed as it's the connector which controls the weight. They are also available from the factory with the ill-famed NY Trigger, which we all know is MUCH heavier than the 5.5#. Which again, is a specific addressment of a precieved SAFETY issue. Or you can go the opposite way and get a 3.5#. Once you start modding the pistol, you are making it a speciality piece. For general carry, anything lighter than 4# is a lawsuit waiting to happen as it is. :evil:

I do hope you are referring to Glocks, M&Ps and FN's only with your statement of "none will fire unless you pull the trigger". ADs and ND's happen all the time from dropped cocked pistols. Anything with a hammer can fail and cause an AD. So I really wouldn't include the FN in that catagory myself.
 

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Anything with a hammer can fail and cause an AD. So I really wouldn't include the FN in that catagory myself.
I'm interested in why you say that. The FNP has a passive firing pin safety that blocks the firing pin from moving forward unless the trigger is pulled. In addition, when decocked the hammer sits in a half cock position held off of the firing pin by the right half of the sear. Seems like the combination would prevent the firing pin from moving forward unless the trigger is pulled. Are there scenarios when a dropped FNP could discharge?
[/quote]
 

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Texas_XD said:
I do hope you are referring to Glocks, M&Ps and FN's only with your statement of "none will fire unless you pull the trigger". ADs and ND's happen all the time from dropped cocked pistols. Anything with a hammer can fail and cause an AD. So I really wouldn't include the FN in that catagory myself.
The bold text is an exaggeration on your part, unless you care to share some data to the contrary. If a cocked and locked pistol fires due to being dropped, then the pistol is either defective or it's an obsolete design.

Now, guns with external hammers that are SAO and do not have a firing pin safety can fire when dropped if the user chambers a round and then manually lowers the hammer (carrying the gun hammer-down on a loaded chamber), but even that is rare and in carrying that way, the user circumvents the entire premise of the SAO safety mechanism anyway, so it's hard to blame that on the gun.
 

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Fabius said:
I'm interested in why you say that. The FNP has a passive firing pin safety that blocks the firing pin from moving forward unless the trigger is pulled. In addition, when decocked the hammer sits in a half cock position held off of the firing pin by the right half of the sear. Seems like the combination would prevent the firing pin from moving forward unless the trigger is pulled. Are there scenarios when a dropped FNP could discharge?
Not unless the gun malfunctions or a part fails...very unlikely.
 

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Can the FN FNP 45 DA/SA be used as a SAO? With one in the chamber, hammer back and safty on, or is that a SAO only thing? I am a Police Officer and we are issued the Glock 9 or 40, but we can carry whatever we want. I like the 45acp, 1911, but I love the FN FNP 45, but want to carry it like a 1911, SAO safty on.
 
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