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Has anyone had issues with the gun shooting somewhat low? Maybe 4 inches or so? I had someone at a range test my gun in order to adjust it and he said that I would either need to compensate myself or change the sights. Curious if anyone else has done anything and what works best. I saw several sizes on https://dawsonprecision.com/fnh-fns-fiber-optic-front-sights/ and figured one of them has to be good for 20-25 yard range but I'm pretty new to this all. Any help would be apprciated! Thanks in advanced.

I saw these stock dimensions in another post. Width isn't a huge deal to me, actually I've read that slimmer sights make target acquisition faster.


  • Front Sight Height: 0.288"
  • Front Sight Width: 0.130"
 

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What sight picture are you using FN uses the combat sight picture! might be the reason you are shooting low
 

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SpojyCat said:
I've read that slimmer sights make target acquisition faster.
I wonder how sight width might makes a difference -- or what parts work best when slimmer?

A thinner front sight blade might be helpful for me, but not if the rear notch is narrower, too. I like sight designs that make the front sight stand out more clearly in the rear sight notch both vertically and horizontally. IF the rear notch is slimmer too, I'd probably have problems. But a too-wide rear notch would be a problem for me, too.

You seldom have a lot of choices in that trait when looking for off-the-shelf sights. If you go somewhere like Brownells and "roll your own" it could work. Makers of tritium (night) sights seem to offer fewer options in that way (if only because the tritium vials all seem to be about the same size).
 

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My FNS-9C that I recently purchased was pretty much on with the front sight right where I wanted the bullet to hit.

The front and rear sight were to close in width so I ordered a thinner front sight but the same height. I believe the original and my replacement front sight height were both . 200 tall.

This might help, it is copied from the Sevigny Performance sight: "All sight ratios allow for fast acquisition and precise alignment when engaging at speed.Taylor your selection based on personal preference and type of shooting.

  • .150” wide rear notch with a .115” front- Best for practical shooting, speed steel and target shooting. Fairly open sight picture.

  • .125” wide rear notch with a .105” wide front- Best for practical shooting, speed steel and target shooting. Slightly tighter sight picture than the .150” rear/.115” front.

  • .125” wide rear notch with a .115” wide front- Best for PAR-time shooting sports and target shooting. Tightest sight picture."
So as you can see width and gap it is a personal thing and depends on what kind of shooting. For standing still, target shooting , not much light showing on either side of the front sight is fine. For practical or combat style which is what I mostly do, I like more light so a good combination for me is a .140 wide rear and a .110 wide front.
 

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I should've mentioned it when I replied above, but changing sight-width will have no effect on whether you're shooting higher or lower. THAT is likely more related to your sight picture (as noted in LESTER'S reply above.)

How you pull the trigger or squeeze the grips can also affect the point of impact. Folks shooiting striker-fired guns for the first time ALSO seem, at first, to shoot low, but with often a low left (if they're right-handed, and low-right if they're left-handed.)

Here's a chart that might help. While it's intended for BULLSEYE shooting (one-handed marksmanship), it applies to many shooters, because when they're using both hands, they're still using their strong hand MORE than they realize...



Here's a link to more info... Encyclopedia of Bullseye Pistol
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for the input and replies.

Also I appreciate the diagram, but as I said I had someone else shoot the gun and tell me it was shooting low. Someone who worked at the range and I was under the impression as "knowing his ****." He may have been using the wrong sight patern. I actually went out yesterday and was able to hit the target with pretty much every bullet, some a little high, some a little low. He was probably using the wrong one, and i'm sure the gun is fine :) Thank you guys!
 

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SpoojyCat said:
Also I appreciate the diagram, but as I said I had someone else shoot the gun and tell me it was shooting low. Someone who worked at the range and I was under the impression as "knowing his ****." He may have been using the wrong sight patern. I actually went out yesterday and was able to hit the target with pretty much every bullet, some a little high, some a little low. He was probably using the wrong one, and i'm sure the gun is fine :smile: Thank you guys!
I saw you mentioned that you had another person at the range shoot your gun, but I couldn't tell from that whether he knew what he was talking about -- since he didn't mention the sight-picture and appeared to bet the same results you were getting.

Sounds like you found the proper solution by changing your sight picture. Hang onto the Bullseye chart, as you'll likely want to refer to it in the future...
 
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