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Discussion Starter #1
Please forgive my confusion and or lack of FN knowledge. New to the forum. I just got a 57, my first FN. Absolutely love it. Thinking about maybe an FNS9 or 40. I have an XDM 40 which is single action striker fired. The factory website lists the FNS as double action. So am I correct in thinking that if you rack the gun a round is in battery and ready to fire (SA) and maybe it has a decocker to make it ready and safe and thus double action is necessary to fire the gun?
 

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welcome to the forum, congrats on your new FsN.

Single-action and double-action refer to how a gun's mechanism operates when the trigger is pulled. The "double" in double-action means the trigger performs two functions: cocking, and then firing the gun. The hammer cannot be manually cocked back; only the pull of the trigger can cause that to happen. Most weapons are single-action (SA) but some handguns (pistols and revolvers) can be double-action (DAO aka double-action only) or single-action/double-action (SA/DA).



http://www.diffen.com/difference/Single_Action_vs_Double_Action
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sa/ da

so then if you rack the gun a round is in battery but it still is double action meaning when you pull the trigger you are cocking and then triggering the hammer ie there is no SA quick fire like my 57 is.
 

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dbbrooks, No. Most (I am not going to assume every striker pistol action functions the same and there are different designs) striker pistols have the same action so the XDM and the FNS have similar actions. You insert the magazine, rack the slide to load the pistol and set the striker and fire until the pistol is empty with one pull of the trigger firing each bullet.

The Five-Seven is a semi-automatic delayed blowback pistol chambered for FN's 5.7x28mm ammunition. The pistol appears hammerless, but it has a concealed hammer. Current models of the Five-Seven are single-action, having a short and light trigger pull of 2 to 3 daN (4.4 to 6.6lbF). The Five-Seven has a different action/design from a FNS and FNX.
 

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It is striker fired. Just like the glock, xd, m&p etc. basically it activates the striker differently. Rack it pull the trigger same as other striker fired. Every company has there own trigger group design. I believe fn calls it pre loaded. If you google i'm sure you will find a very technical answer.

Ha, I was typing while he was.
 

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Welcome to the forum and congrats!:?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks to all for the welcome signs and responses. If the FNS is similar (ie. rack and fire) why does the factory list the gun as double action? I'm seriously considering getting one vs keeping the XDM. Sure wish FN made a sub compact carry pistol.
 

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My question is why does the springfield website not list the action...at least as obvious as FNH USA?
Research actions and you will understand.

Note: If you take a CC course you will learn the answer.
 

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Thanks to all for the welcome signs and responses. If the FNS is similar (ie. rack and fire) why does the factory list the gun as double action? I'm seriously considering getting one vs keeping the XDM. Sure wish FN made a sub compact carry pistol.
Many of us wish FN made a sub compact carry pistol. I would immediately buy an FNS-9C if it was offered, assuming they made it double stack.
 

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Thanks to all for the welcome signs and responses. If the FNS is similar (ie. rack and fire) why does the factory list the gun as double action? I'm seriously considering getting one vs keeping the XDM. Sure wish FN made a sub compact carry pistol.
Double action does not equal Hammer fired.

In a striker gun there is no hammer—instead a striker mechanism is combined with the firing pin and a sear that applies tension and then releases the firing pin to fire the pistol. In some designs working the slide fully charges the striker so that the trigger only releases it, which is considered single-action. In other designs the trigger both charges (at least partially) and then releases the striker, making it a double-action. The FNS uses this second system and like all striker pistols offers the advantage of a light and consistent trigger squeeze for every shot.
 

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The FNS (many other striker-fired pistols) are listed as double-action only (DAO) pistols but are not truly so. They have a slight take up that finishes the cocking process (hence the two-stage trigger). When a striker pistol is fired, it mostly cocks the striker mechanism. The advantage is that the trigger pull is lighter that a regular true double-action pistol. It also allows for a short reset if you keep the trigger to the rear while the pistol is fired. By easing the trigger forward, you feel and hear a 'click' and you can fire the weapon again (like a single-action pistol). Hence, it really isn't a double-action. With training and practice, you can produce very rapid accurate follow up shots.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you for the very good explanation. I've heard about the partial charge. That explains my confusion! Thank you.
 
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