FN Herstal Firearms banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Opportunity for a hog hunt is presenting itself. My FS2K is my my only rifle. After some research, it appears that .223 will be adequate for hogs, making sure I do my part and choose the proper bullet selection and shot placement.

Ranges should be less than 100 yards. The rifle currently wears a Leupold VXR 1-4 Firedot SPR in Warne low fixed rings, and I've managed to get almost 1 MOA at 100 yards with match ammo and the stock trigger (four shots at about 7/8" with one flyer opening up to about 1.5 inches, which may have been my fault), so I'm pretty confident it's do-able.

Has anybody taken any oinkers with the Tuna? If so, what was your experience?

Thanks, Guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,639 Posts
The Tuna should be excellent for hogs. Just like what you said, it's the caliber and your shot placement which will get the job done.

I've shot hogs with ARs and Mini14s with only .223 and dropping a full grown hog is easy to do with a single shot.

IIRC, the Tuna is chambered for 5.56, which I believe can fire both 5.56 and .223 interchangeably which therefore gives you a wider range of loadings to take them damn piggies with.
Shoot them all up, those damn things literally DESTROY land and crops. Those bastards very easily put farmers into serious financial hardships.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,628 Posts
We have had them run away quite a ways after being hit behind the shoulder with a .223. So we switched to shooting them in brain pan. They still run after being shot behind the shoulder with a .308 but they usually only make it 20-30 yards or so. If you're going for a heart shot you might have to track it a bit. Good luck on your hog hunt man it's a lot of fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,663 Posts
Opportunity for a hog hunt is presenting itself. My FS2K is my my only rifle. After some research, it appears that .223 will be adequate for hogs, making sure I do my part and choose the proper bullet selection and shot placement.

Ranges should be less than 100 yards. The rifle currently wears a Leupold VXR 1-4 Firedot SPR in Warne low fixed rings, and I've managed to get almost 1 MOA at 100 yards with match ammo and the stock trigger (four shots at about 7/8" with one flyer opening up to about 1.5 inches, which may have been my fault), so I'm pretty confident it's do-able.

Has anybody taken any oinkers with the Tuna? If so, what was your experience?

Thanks, Guys.

do it!!! and post pics!! the tuna is a surgical tool when used correctly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks again, guys.

As far as shot placement goes, there seems to be two different trains of thought on preferred shot placement, and both have been successful at putting bacon on the breakfast platter. The first is the turning out the lights immediately by placing a bullet in the brain or central nervous system. I see both a pro and a con with this. The pro is that it would be pretty forgiving as far as bullet construction. The con is that it's a smaller target, and requires a little more accuracy. Hence, for this type, I would have some work to do at the range to make sure the rifle/ammo/shooter is capable actually being able to place the bullet in the brain-pan at distance and in field conditions. Also, this shot may not be available if the hog quarters away.

The second option is for heart/lung shots. Compared to deer, it appears this can also be a little bit of a challenge. It seems that a hog's "boiler room" is located further up front and a little lower, so there could be leg/shoulder bone in the way. Combine that with the already tough hide, shield, and fat layer, bullet selection becomes a little more important. It appears that bullets designed for rapid or explosive fragmentation in varmints should be avoided in favor of bullets known for weight retention and penetration. I also have to keep in mind that even if the hear/lungs are hit, there's a good chance that the pig will need to be tracked, so I've got to do some homework on the terrain. I understand that poking around for an injured hog in cactii will probably make the experience a little less pleasant.

Expanding bonded or solids are looking pretty attractive to me at the moment, because they could work for both types of shots. The work ahead of me now is to get a hold of some factory ammo and try it. I'm thinking Hornady GMX, Interlok, Barnes TTX to name a few. Try them all in the rifle, and choose the one that provides the best accuracy. Then work up the ballistics dope for my rifle/ammo/optics combo.

The above was less of a statement and more of thinking out loud, hoping to solicit input/feedback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,628 Posts
The solid Barnes bullets would be my choice. The penetration is unquestionable and I believe it would actually expand well in a big tough hog. The same cannot be said about white tail in my case. It left a hole the size of a half dollar and the deer still ran after being double lunged quite a ways. The bullet didn't transfer enough its energy for my liking. A big hog on the other hand - prime Barnes territory.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wabbi69

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,118 Posts
No problem.

Remember shot placement, and have fun!!!


Just remember the bullpup is just as effective as a non bullpup rifle with same barrel length and ammo. Bullpup is just a more compact platform over all.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aquaticpig

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
If you are wanting meat and not wanting to track the animal for a mile, you need to earhole it with .223. Even with .308 a double lung shot will still let them run 50-100yards before they gas out. If it's difficult or brushy terrain, they can be hard to find if your hunting at night. Our pigs generally suck for meat, especially this time of year, so I just gut shoot them and let them run off to my neighbors property to die- he owns half the county. The little ones are tasty in the winter, I'm guessing it all depends on their diet. Headshots within a 100 yards shouldn't be a problem.
Thanks again, guys.

As far as shot placement goes, there seems to be two different trains of thought on preferred shot placement, and both have been successful at putting bacon on the breakfast platter. The first is the turning out the lights immediately by placing a bullet in the brain or central nervous system. I see both a pro and a con with this. The pro is that it would be pretty forgiving as far as bullet construction. The con is that it's a smaller target, and requires a little more accuracy. Hence, for this type, I would have some work to do at the range to make sure the rifle/ammo/shooter is capable actually being able to place the bullet in the brain-pan at distance and in field conditions. Also, this shot may not be available if the hog quarters away.

The second option is for heart/lung shots. Compared to deer, it appears this can also be a little bit of a challenge. It seems that a hog's "boiler room" is located further up front and a little lower, so there could be leg/shoulder bone in the way. Combine that with the already tough hide, shield, and fat layer, bullet selection becomes a little more important. It appears that bullets designed for rapid or explosive fragmentation in varmints should be avoided in favor of bullets known for weight retention and penetration. I also have to keep in mind that even if the hear/lungs are hit, there's a good chance that the pig will need to be tracked, so I've got to do some homework on the terrain. I understand that poking around for an injured hog in cactii will probably make the experience a little less pleasant.

Expanding bonded or solids are looking pretty attractive to me at the moment, because they could work for both types of shots. The work ahead of me now is to get a hold of some factory ammo and try it. I'm thinking Hornady GMX, Interlok, Barnes TTX to name a few. Try them all in the rifle, and choose the one that provides the best accuracy. Then work up the ballistics dope for my rifle/ammo/optics combo.

The above was less of a statement and more of thinking out loud, hoping to solicit input/feedback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
It is the ideal gun. Light, compact, perfect balance. I prefer the factory sights over optics on the FS2000, but I'm weird like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I'd like to pop a warthog from a chopper like the beginning of Blackhawk Down.

I don't own an FS2000 (yet!) but I do own a SCAR 16. This is the ammo that shoots best in my SCAR, it should make for excellent piggie hunting ammo as it was designed for the marines/SEALs to penetrate when shooting at people who are shooting at you from a vehicle. Too much penetration for home defense though.

Text Font Room Architecture


 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top