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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Barnes makes these nice solid brass banded bullets. But they are EXPENSIVE.

I'm sitting here looking at a pile of useless old range brass.

I know I can melt the brass at home- its fun to turn cases into puddles with the MAP gas torch. The question is can I pour molten brass into a regular bullet mold and end up with a serviceable bullet?

I'd like some assurance before I go out and buy a mold.
 

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Turned on a lathe from stock IIRC. At least that what they look like up close.

Careful here though - a solid brass projectile may be considered AP by the ATF.

(i) a projectile or projectile core which may be used in a handgun and which is constructed entirely (excluding the presence of traces of other substances) from one or a combination of tungsten alloys, steel, iron, brass, bronze, beryllium copper, or depleted uranium...

The ATF states emphaticly that the Barnes Banded Solid does not fit into this catagory because it is constructed from a 'homogenous [SIC] copper/zinc alloy, not beryllium copper" and as such are NOT 'AP' in a handgun.

homogeneous: closely similar or comparable in kind or quality or quantity or degree

Aparently the brass must be made of beryllium copper which would make it beryllium brass, not just plain old brass.

Another example is if one was to make a projectile out of Aich's Metal which is copper 60.66%, zinc 36.58%, tin 1.02%, iron 1.74% (in other words brass (copper and zinc), bronze (copper and tin), and iron) it still would not be considered an AP projectile because it is a mixture of brass, bronze, and iron with a more than a trace amount of tin and copper (not beryllium), and by defenition, anything with more than a trace amount of non listed materials is not AP.

However, if it is made entirely of steel (iron and carbon) it is AP yet 'carbon' is not on the list of prohibited materials, but iron is. Wouldn't carbon be then considered a 'trace' material (as carbon content can be down to less than .2%) and disqualify steel as well?

Talk to Will Baca. He has had dealings with the ATF about projectiles in these catagories.

As Lrrr would say "this confuses and infuriates us..."
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info. I remember what they said about Will's carbon fiber STP. I think they make up the rules as they go along.

For what it's worth I'm not looking for an expedient AP bullet. - Just an economical green (green as in unleaded and good for mother nature, and indoor ranges) bullet with good weight retention.

I'm thinking the brass will stick to the sides of a metal mold. I'm not interested in doing a lost wax thing with plaster.

I don't know why I thought those barnes solids were brass. I think I'll be scratching this idea and just buying the barnes bullets.
 

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Here is a pic. .224 dia 45grains in weight.


Be careful when loading these as I remember there were some problems that loaders had with Barnes bullets as they needed extra room or something. I believe people were loading them to close to the rifling and this caused the pressure to spike. A Barnes solid is a lot tougher than a lead core FMJ.
 
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