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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Air gun Trigger Wood Rectangle Gun barrel
Air gun Wood Rectangle Trigger Gun barrel
Air gun Wood Rectangle Trigger Gun barrel Hi-
I found this pistol among my late father’s things. (I have attempted to include 2 pictures below.) I was hoping that someone here might be able to give me an idea of when it was manufactured, and perhaps point me to a good resource where I could learn more about the gun. Thanks for any info anyone might be able to share.
Best,
Jon
145149
145150
 

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Hi Jon,

Welcome, sorry to hear of the loss of your father. You have come to the right place though, there are some very High Power knowledgeable members here. I however am not one of them but please continue to hold and someone will be along shortly to assist you.
 

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Condolences on your loss. It’s difficult to date an old hi power strictly by serial number. FN would restart serializing when they got a different contract, distinguished by a letter being added to the serial number. That appears to be what happened with yours, but I can’t make out the character. And I don’t know what the ‘61’ on the frame is, but it obviously was added larger. But your gun is of the oldest style, with internal extractor, ring hammer, and take down pin relief cut on the slide. The grips look to be replacements. Anthony Vanderlinden wrote the definitive book on hi power, but like a previous poster said, there are experts up here who will provide a lot more insight, probably correct me where I made mistakes!

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thank you!

Condolences on your loss. It’s difficult to date an old hi power strictly by serial number. FN would restart serializing when they got a different contract, distinguished by a letter being added to the serial number. That appears to be what happened with yours, but I can’t make out the character. And I don’t know what the ‘61’ on the frame is, but it obviously was added larger. But your gun is of the oldest style, with internal extractor, ring hammer, and take down pin relief cut on the slide. The grips look to be replacements. Anthony Vanderlinden wrote the definitive book on hi power, but like a previous poster said, there are experts up here who will provide a lot more insight, probably correct me where I made mistakes!

Good luck.
 

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Hi Jon,

Sorry for your loss.

There are date codes on pistols of this era. My 1950 has a [0.] stamped upside down on the left forward side of the trigger guard. I have seen 1952 and later pistols with a similar marks [2] on the right side. There are corresponding marks on various parts of the pistol, inside the slide, hammer, barrel, which may not be the same date code. I tend to go by the date code on the frame for dating the production of a pistol.

If you can find these marks, especially on the trigger guard, and make detailed pics... it may be possible to date it to the quarter of a year it was stamped.

Yours was made before 1960. My 1950 has a serial number of 28915. Although early serial numbers are not reliable, by serial number yours may be '52 or '53.

This is a pic of my 1950 trigger guard:

Brown Wood Air gun Trigger Material property


This dates it to the forth quarter of 1950. It was confusing at first... it is stamped upside down and you can tell only because of the period following the number.

By the way, after cleaning her up and replacing all the springs (plus the SFS kit), she shoots like new.

Cheers,

Tim
 

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I'm fairly ignorant as to Hi Powers, but it sure does look like a German eagle/swastika engraved right above the slide stop notch. If it is, that may be of some help dating it.

My condolences on your loss.
 

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I'm fairly ignorant as to Hi Powers, but it sure does look like a German eagle/swastika engraved right above the slide stop notch. If it is, that may be of some help dating it.
This is a possibility.
A good clear detailed photo or two of different markings will reveal more.

My 1943 in the same area:

Brown Motor vehicle Wood Automotive exterior Font



Cheers,

Tim
 

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Intrigued by this I just did some digging myself, that mark is definitely a Nazi manufacturing mark. Jon, was your father a WWII vet?
 

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Good sleuthing guys... I missed it at first.

Looking at an enlarged photo on the ejection port side:

-There is no hole for a magazine disconnect on the trigger, a feature eliminated during occupation.
-The serial number string seems to end with ' b '
-The full SN appears only on the slide, with partial SN on the barrel and frame. According to the Blake Stevens book, this was the last Nazi SN modification, introduced in the spring of 1944.
-The finish looks rather rough compared even to other occupation years. The war was turning and there wasn't time.

It is reported that this serial number change occurred in the spring of 1944, well into the production of ' b ' suffix pistols. By September, 63,000 ' b ' suffix pistols had been produced. Possibly, fewer than 1,300 were produced by the Germans using forced labor after this one. An interesting collectible? If it was not issued during the end of the war, it could have been sold to a USGI by an FN worker.

As a caution: these would be the poorest finished occupation pistols, the ones they say you should fire only with great care.

Wood Red Tints and shades Gun accessory Automotive lighting



Cheers,

Tim
 
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