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Good day!

One of the ergonomic modifications I made to my SCAR 16s was to change the original pistol grip. The finger divider was a source of unwanted attention with my shooting hand so off it went. I replaced it with a Troy Battleaxe Control grip. Total installation was about 5 minutes. I've enclosed pictures below showing the difference in grip angle. About the color: I ordered FDE but somehow they sent tan.

Overlaying the Troy grip with the OEM grip:
1.jpg

Comparing grip angles:
2.jpg

Grip screws (Troy, Geissele, OEM):
3.jpg

Finished installation:
4.jpg

Cheers!

Domino
 

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Nice post.
 
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Very nice, just to be sure the grip screw provided did NOT protrude into the trigger module, correct? The screw too much in the module is the bane of SCAR shooters everywhere.
 

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That grip looks very good, similar angle to the magpul K2 & BCM gunfighter grips, but I swear I've seen other "battle axe" grips with a grip angle more similar to the stock grip... Is there more than 1 version of this grip? Also, does this grip have storage capability?
 

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IMHO those CQB grips are a bad idea unless, as the name implies, you've got a SBR or a pistol or a bullpup (but most of those have integrated grips). The heavier front and steep drop of the grip means more fatigue on your arm and wrist. Try this little experiment. Hold a traditional rifle (not bullpups) with 16" barrel with one hand and arm held straight out with both CQB grip and one with more rake back and you will notice you have to keep a much tighter grip with the more vertical grip in order to hold the rifle straight than with the traditional A2 grip.
 
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IMHO those CQB grips are a bad idea unless, as the name implies, you've got a SBR or a pistol or a bullpup (but most of those have integrated grips). The heavier front and steep drop of the grip means more fatigue on your arm and wrist. Try this little experiment. Hold a traditional rifle (not bullpups) with 16" barrel with one hand and arm held straight out with both CQB grip and one with more rake back and you will notice you have to keep a much tighter grip with the more vertical grip in order to hold the rifle straight than with the traditional A2 grip.
The A2 & chicken winging rifles should have faded into oblivion back in the 70s, I have a strong preference for a more vertical grip. Since I started shooting I have despised the more traditional angles as they've never felt comfortable and fatigued my wrist quickly.
 

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The A2 & chicken winging rifles should have faded into oblivion back in the 70s, I have a strong preference for a more vertical grip. Since I started shooting I have despised the more traditional angles as they've never felt comfortable and fatigued my wrist quickly.
I kinda agree, but that's only because military firearms have gotten shorter (to adopt to fights in increasingly urban and tight environments) as a result the grip have moved more to the center of balance eliminating the need a more angled back pistol grip. This is especially true with any bullpup rifles.

However, with vast majority of the traditional rifles (non-sbr or bullpups) owned by civilians, the grip is still far back from the point of balance. So to offset the heavy weight bias to the front, angled back pistol grip is necessary. This is also one of the reasons why you almost NEVER see anyone running a pistol grip on a shotgun in a 3gun competition; most of them run straight stocks.
 

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Very nice, just to be sure the grip screw provided did NOT protrude into the trigger module, correct? The screw too much in the module is the bane of SCAR shooters everywhere.
Thank you for the reminder, SeaMac! Yes, I used the Geissele-provided screw to secure the grip to the lower receiver - that was part 2 of my Monday meditation :) One thing I noticed is that the Geissele screw didn't even come close to the hole so I'm good to go.
 

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That grip looks very good, similar angle to the magpul K2 & BCM gunfighter grips, but I swear I've seen other "battle axe" grips with a grip angle more similar to the stock grip... Is there more than 1 version of this grip? Also, does this grip have storage capability?
Looking at the Troy Industries website, this is the only grip they have. Yes, there is a storage compartment at the bottom and the tab that secures the bottom plate is pretty secure.
 

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I bought this same grip in black and the angle is perfect for shooting from a squared shooting stance but alas it's just too short for my wide hands so it goes in the "Junk Drawer" as soon as I get my new BCM Gunfighter Grip.

CPTdaz does have a point though. The only time the straight PDW grip is comfortable is when you are locked into your squared shooting position. During weapon handling and patrol activities and even bringing the weapon up into position from patrol carry the extra leverage provided by the normal grip angle is missed and the weapon doesn't come up as snappy and requires more effort to steer into position when changing leads, chamber checks, inserting mags ect. I did 100 of my dryfire malfunction drills with the Troy grip on and it was using a lot more strength to hold the weapon in position while I practiced my TRB.
 

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IMHO those CQB grips are a bad idea unless, as the name implies, you've got a SBR or a pistol or a bullpup (but most of those have integrated grips). The heavier front and steep drop of the grip means more fatigue on your arm and wrist. Try this little experiment. Hold a traditional rifle (not bullpups) with 16" barrel with one hand and arm held straight out with both CQB grip and one with more rake back and you will notice you have to keep a much tighter grip with the more vertical grip in order to hold the rifle straight than with the traditional A2 grip.
With my long gangly arms, the steep angle grips are a huge improvement for me (the A2 angle grips did fatigue my wrist, especially since I more tuck my elbow than stick it out, but to each their own). They fit with my shooting style, even though I run with stocks fully extended/A2 length stocks.
 
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