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It might seem trivial but I'm going to start reloading next year (buying equipment in pieces). Does it matter which handloading manual to use such as Lee, Hornady, RCBS and Lyman. Are they all the same with the loading data but the difference is in with the parts and bullets they used. Just wondering.
 

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No, there are variances in the load date as well. I suggest that you get a few of them. I have the Lyman, Hornady, and Lee manuals and you should also look for the powder manufacturers load data sheets as well. I mostly use Ramshot powders so I use their load data and verify with the other three.

You should always check the powder manufacturers data first then go to the Load Books for additional data. You will find that the Powder Manufacturers load data does not have all the projectile data that you will probably use and the Load Books do not always have the powder data that you will probably use.

So it is really a combination of the two but use the powder manufacturers data first.
 

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What he /\ said, You can never have to few manuals.
 

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Not to hijack this thread but it's on the same topic of different types of components used, what about different brass where can I get specs for brass like minimum load and primer data. I have the Lyman but it tells me to use remington when I have a surplus of other than remington brass and their primers are more expensive than cci and Winchester.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Not to hijack this thread but it's on the same topic of different types of components used, what about different brass where can I get specs for brass like minimum load and primer data. I have the Lyman but it tells me to use remington when I have a surplus of other than remington brass and their primers are more expensive than cci and Winchester.

Thanks in advance!

Have not found much differance in shells except Nato brass(usually says reduce by a certain percent as the brass is heavier and less volume ) but as the manual says all ways work your load up when changing a item, Do not substitute magnum primers unless stated. Straight wall pistol is very forgiving and if new to reloading start there. Necked down rounds as found in rifle cartridges are not as forgiving if you mess up. And as I said earlier you need more than one manual, I have at least 6 to compare different components and min/max loads.
 

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Not to hijack this thread but it's on the same topic of different types of components used, what about different brass where can I get specs for brass like minimum load and primer data. I have the Lyman but it tells me to use remington when I have a surplus of other than remington brass and their primers are more expensive than cci and Winchester.

Thanks in advance!
All of that will be in the load data. Most data books tell you what specific components THEY used to come up with their load data, ie - weapon used, barrel length, type/manufacturer of primer, brass manufacturer, etc. You don't necessarily HAVE to use those self same components when building your ammo. As long as you stay away from max charges, you should be good to go.

There's going to be a difference in load data from the powder makers to the bullet makers to equipment makers. As others have advised, it's better to have several sources available to you in order to get a feel for what the starting point and middle ground is for a given projectile and a particular powder.

If you're going to use Olin powders (Hodgdon, IMR, Winchester), they have a very good online data center that's very convenient and easy to use.
 

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I'm still reading I'm going to get more manuals now because I think I should. Now for the military brass I think I saw that the NRA says to bring it down 12% but the users online say 10% now is that 10-12% from MAX or MIN? Also is there some where I can reference load manuals before I buy to make sure they are really going to help me by beingdifferent?
 

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I'm still reading I'm going to get more manuals now because I think I should. Now for the military brass I think I saw that the NRA says to bring it down 12% but the users online say 10% now is that 10-12% from MAX or MIN? Also is there some where I can reference load manuals before I buy to make sure they are really going to help me by beingdifferent?
When using military brass, unless the load data specifically uses military brass, reduce the entire data by 10%, from start to max. More for small case pistol rounds. On a rifle load of 42 grains, 10% or 4.2 grains less is OK. On pistol rounds, a 6 grain load reduced by 10% is only .6 grains which might not be enough of a reduction. It will be up to you to decide where you want to start. I like the Lee manual as it shows the case volume. Always check the volume content on military brass to help with adjusting the powder charge.

Trim to length, plug the primer pocket (I have various rubber erasers for this), and fill the case with water. Make sure the case is cleaned inside (why I use SS pins and a tumbler for cleaning brass) then measure the volume of the fluid. Water will expand at different temps so I use brake fluid instead of water. Use a good scientific scaled volume measuring device. My digital scale works very well. I have an extra powder pan for this use.

Most of the volume data can be found on line though.
 
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