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Discussion Starter #1
I have read on multiple sources online that some guns just seem to shoot "better" with certain types of ammo. Personally, it seems like I shoot my FN 509T with Apex trigger a bit more accurately with Winchester M1152 Active Duty 9mm FMJ than I do with other types of ammo. The Winchester M1152 is loaded for NATO mil specs, so it definitely feels a bit spicier when it comes to recoil. That said, If I am trying to aim carefully, it seems to do better than other varieties of FMJ and JHP ammo I have tried. What are your experiences?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I guess I should add that, clearly, 9x19mm ammo is all but impossible to find online or in person, these days. but from what you have in stock or have fired previously, is there a "better" ammo for the 509?
 

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I think it depends on what you mean by "better". It eats pretty much anything. Spicy NATO ammo works the gun harder and will wear down parts faster. For accuracy, standard defense loads tend to be just fine. If you're just running drills, unless you need insane accuracy for something, and target ammo will do. Some of it is more precise than others. Winchester was kind of meh. Blazer and Norma seemed fine. Had some geco and scorpion brand that was alright. I like 124 better than 115. Seems to do a little better with drilling holes.

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A general rule of thumb, feed a firearm whatever it shoots the most reliably and accurately with the operative emphasis on reliably.

It is somewhat important to know what type of shooting is to be done. If SD/HD you want to shoot as many offerings available to determine reliability and accuracy once that's established choose a ballistically equivalent round to practice with.

Those familiar with firearms know it takes time and of course $$$ to determine best ammo for any particular firearm as well as intended use. The needs of plinkers, precision target shooters, combat shooters etc are all different.
 

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Those familiar with firearms know it takes time and of course $$$ to determine best ammo for any particular firearm
Yeah, ain't that the truth! Right now, I'm a plinker/HD kind of guy. Skill wise, I'm a bit north of a novice but well south of Expert. Basically, I just need a lot more range time, and would probably benefit a lot from some professional instruction. Given that it's basically impossible to find 9mm ammo right now unless you're willing to pay $1/cartridge, this is kind of academic. But I guess my intent was to ask if y'all had a favorite type of good quality target ammo to use to improve my skills.

Cheers!
 

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Yeah, ain't that the truth! Right now, I'm a plinker/HD kind of guy. Skill wise, I'm a bit north of a novice but well south of Expert. Basically, I just need a lot more range time, and would probably benefit a lot from some professional instruction. Given that it's basically impossible to find 9mm ammo right now unless you're willing to pay $1/cartridge, this is kind of academic. But I guess my intent was to ask if y'all had a favorite type of good quality target ammo to use to improve my skills.

Cheers!
If it eats it, it's good enough for most fundamentals practice. I would recommend looking up low round use fundamentals drills and dry fire practice stuff rather than worry about what practice ammo to use. That said, fiocci 124 grain and Blazer 124 grain have always been good range ammo. When it's not a stupid shortage, it's generally reasonably priced and fairly consistent.

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Yeah, ain't that the truth! Right now, I'm a plinker/HD kind of guy. Skill wise, I'm a bit north of a novice but well south of Expert. Basically, I just need a lot more range time, and would probably benefit a lot from some professional instruction. Given that it's basically impossible to find 9mm ammo right now unless you're willing to pay $1/cartridge, this is kind of academic. But I guess my intent was to ask if y'all had a favorite type of good quality target ammo to use to improve my skills.

Cheers!

As stated, little requirement for live ammo to learn the fundamentals. Obviously some of the stuff in this book e.g. operating the M9 won't apply but an investment in the training exercises would go a long way. When dry firing try to reinforce good habits (keeping eyes open through fire, Trigger control being able to find and hold the trigger just before it releases, smooth release, front sight in-focus literally) vs. just going for # of firing pin drops and jerking the trigger.

Speaking of dry fire - do you have Apex's heavy duty striker in the pistol?
 

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Since you're essentially new to shooting, what has been suggested is worthy of attention. Most handgun fundamentals can be learned without live ammo. I would however recommend against dry firing ANY firearm instead use snap caps or dummy rounds your firing pin will reward you!

Trigger control, sight acquisition and alignment are fundamentals that should never be done with live ammo, it can be very frustrating and costly in ammo. Practice the above until reasonably competent before going "live"

All that said, the most important ideas that can be expressed that are also free are, commitment and dedication. You have to practice and practice then practice some more.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
https://www.marines.mil/Portals/1/Publications/MCRP%203-01B%20Pistol%20Marksmanship.pdf
As stated, little requirement for live ammo to learn the fundamentals. Obviously some of the stuff in this book e.g. operating the M9 won't apply but an investment in the training exercises would go a long way. When dry firing try to reinforce good habits (keeping eyes open through fire, Trigger control being able to find and hold the trigger just before it releases, smooth release, front sight in-focus literally) vs. just going for # of firing pin drops and jerking the trigger.

Speaking of dry fire - do you have Apex's heavy duty striker in the pistol?
Thanks for the link!!! I'll check it out. I hadn't seen any "guide" like this before. Oorah! Semper Fi!

I'm a nerdy science guy, so I did a lot of online research before purchasing this, which is my first gun. I read about the striker issues in the early 509s. From what I can tell, It seems like FN had a bad batch of parts and that newer 509's are fine. Does that check out with what you've heard? In any event, the first thing I did when I bought my 509T is replace the striker with the APEX one. (also, I was curious to see how the internals worked!). I do all of my dry fire exercises with snap caps.
 

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Since you're essentially new to shooting, what has been suggested is worthy of attention. Most handgun fundamentals can be learned without live ammo. I would however recommend against dry firing ANY firearm instead use snap caps or dummy rounds your firing pin will reward you!
Thanks for the advice! I'm new to pistol shooting, but I've been hunting and have done a fair bit of target practice with rifles.

Trigger control, sight acquisition and alignment are fundamentals that should never be done with live ammo, it can be very frustrating and costly in ammo. Practice the above until reasonably competent before going "live"
Wait, why shouldn't you practice trigger control with live ammo in the chamber? :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: But again, good advice for a newbie!

All that said, the most important ideas that can be expressed that are also free are, commitment and dedication. You have to practice and practice then practice some more.
Yeah. Still waiting for that Matrix-like download where I wake up and am like "Whoa! I know Kung Fu!" Until then, guess I'll just have to grind it out like everybody else...
 

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It is somewhat important to know what type of shooting is to be done. If SD/HD you want to shoot as many offerings available to determine reliability and accuracy once that's established choose a ballistically equivalent round to practice with.
I had assumed that a particular type of firearm, say the FN 509T, might shoot more accurately with one brand of ammo than another, but that all, similarly-configured, well-maintained, 509T's would have roughly the same experience. Is it more diabolical than that? Is every gun a special snowflake that has its own personal preference for ammo? I realize that the biggest limitation on my gun's performance is the guy pulling the trigger--trying to work on that. That said, if y'all, who have fired a lot more rounds through the 509 than I have, have a favorite target or home defense ammo, why reinvent the wheel? In this very small sample size, it seems like 124 grain is preferred over 115 grain. I hear nothing but good things about blazer for quality at low cost--whenever it is again that you can find it...
 

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Anything mechanical will have individual quirks between examples of the same model. Firearms are no different. While there are general similarities, you'll find that yours in particular might really like a certain brand/grain of ammo. This is generally true with any model of firearm, and why hand loaders (especially those who compete) are very particular about documenting their loads.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Anything mechanical will have individual quirks between examples of the same model. Firearms are no different. While there are general similarities, you'll find that yours in particular might really like a certain brand/grain of ammo. This is generally true with any model of firearm, and why hand loaders (especially those who compete) are very particular about documenting their loads.
Sure, I get that. If I am competing at an elite level, a difference of a few percent might be really important! If I am relatively new to handgun shooting, probably that difference is lost on me. Obviously, I am the weak link in the chain, but I was wondering if there is a consensus among 509 owners that a certain type of ammunition (for HD or target practice) generally does "better" than other types of ammo or, maybe, each gun has its own mechanical imperfections that make this question invalid.
 

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I can't speak specifically for the 509, but both my FNXs (40 and 45) have cycled everything I put through them to this point, to include steel case. I don't know if the 509 is more picky on that or not, but from an accuracy standpoint I've found that most accuracy issues are on me, rather than the weapon itself. That said, I don't know if the 1:10 barrel twist on the various FN 9mm models has any effect vs the 1:16 that my FNX-40 and FNX-45 have. Since EFK doesn't make a straight 40 barrel, I can't buy one to compare to my factory 40 barrel unfortunately.
 

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For HD cartridges fitted with Hornady FTX bullets will both feed reliably and expand even through denim consistently

For plinking generally Fiocchi, S&B, Blazer (BRASS) are all fine. Most informed people (even me) and your gun will look down on you if you shoot steel or aluminum cased ammo.

124 is the general consensus as the FNs have relatively stout recoil springs.
 
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