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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I apologize if this was answered in a previous thread but the search terms I entered came up empty.

The first thing I did when I took delivery of the rifle this week was to familiarize myself with the manual of arms as well as disassembling & reassembly of the rifle. I discovered that one of the inside corners of the lower had material removed/gouged/shaved. I was wondering if other people have encountered the same issue:

2014-04-29 19.37.20.JPG

2014-04-29 19.37.35.JPG

Many thanks for taking the time to look (and answer) my post.

Wishing everyone the best,

Domino
 

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See the half dozen threads on the same subject. Standard thought is that it is the where a pin from a fixed magazine was removed. The fixed magazine was required for import from Belgium.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
See the half dozen threads on the same subject. Standard thought is that it is the where a pin from a fixed magazine was removed. The fixed magazine was required for import from Belgium.
Thank you for providing me the reason for the issue! I will do a better (manual) search on the subject :)
 

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Another newby question. My T-marks are numerically clear but there is a little overspray onto the next notch of the 1913 rail on about ten slots. Is that normal? I searched and came up empty.

It's a battle rifle, so I don't care. But I have to say I was surprised fn would be sloppy in anything it does.
 

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Another newby question. My T-marks are numerically clear but there is a little overspray onto the next notch of the 1913 rail on about ten slots. Is that normal? I searched and came up empty.

It's a battle rifle, so I don't care. But I have to say I was surprised fn would be sloppy in anything it does.
That's strange, I thought the marks were from a laser. Personally never seen that Foxtrot, but other forum members might have.
 

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Another newby question. My T-marks are numerically clear but there is a little overspray onto the next notch of the 1913 rail on about ten slots. Is that normal? I searched and came up empty.

It's a battle rifle, so I don't care. But I have to say I was surprised fn would be sloppy in anything it does.
Normal as well.
 

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Could be done with laser but the appearance is that of overspray in the perpendicular rail notch. Again, I don't baby guns but thought it was surprising.
 

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See the half dozen threads on the same subject. Standard thought is that it is the where a pin from a fixed magazine was removed. The fixed magazine was required for import from Belgium.
Crap like that makes no logical sense, but the government thinks it's needed. Why? I wish I could ask whoever put that in legislation why? It's so stupid my brain is going to explode.
 
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It's not overspray. A yag laser, depending on wattage setting, can burn very deep and the result is spattering of the burned material. Take a nylon cleaning brush and clean it up if it bugs you.

-SS
 

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Crap like that makes no logical sense, but the government thinks it's needed. Why? I wish I could ask whoever put that in legislation why? It's so stupid my brain is going to explode.

It was a political favor to the labor union, the International Brotherhood of Pin Removers.

I'm kidding...I hope.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
It's not overspray. A yag laser, depending on wattage setting, can burn very deep and the result is spattering of the burned material. Take a nylon cleaning brush and clean it up if it bugs you.

-SS
Thank you, Sarge! I looked up the YAG laser from Wikipedia and the information presented (for the benefit of others)

"Nd:YAG lasers are used in manufacturing for engraving, etching, or marking a variety of metals and plastics"

and

"Nd:YAG lasers are also employed to make subsurface markings in transparent materials such as glass or acrylic glass."

Domino
 

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YAG laser's are cool.
 
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