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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking. Yes, it hurt. Here's what I'm looking at:

A = Number of people shot because they couldn't take the safety off quickly enough, or who got shot while they attempted to engage but forgot the safety was on.

B = Number of people who have been accidentally shot by a firearm that didn't have a safety mechanism.

Please disregard education, training, and common sense as they would work toward preventing both A and B.

See where I'm going? How common is A, really? All I ever hear about is B.
 

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A=Should not own a gun.

B=Should not own a gun.

Never heard of A in real life, and B keep the finger of the trigger.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Alright alright, let me ask in a better fashion:

For those who dislike manual safeties, is it because of the possibility of A happening? Am I missing something else?

The main break in my understanding is folks who go DAO over a manual safety - that seems to me like requiring much more attention to trigger pull (yes, practice is #1) instead of paying attention to flicking a switch. Namely my question is regarding some opinions I've read recently regarding the FsN with manual safety, and some HK pistols with manual safeties.
 

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the FsN with manual safety.
The FsN safety is in a great place. It's easy to operate and was never a problem in the years carried as a duty weapon.

As for the opinions you've read, well you know what they say about opinions.
 
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Alright alright, let me ask in a better fashion:

For those who dislike manual safeties, is it because of the possibility of A happening? Am I missing something else?

The main break in my understanding is folks who go DAO over a manual safety - that seems to me like requiring much more attention to trigger pull (yes, practice is #1) instead of paying attention to flicking a switch. Namely my question is regarding some opinions I've read recently regarding the FsN with manual safety, and some HK pistols with manual safeties.
For modern pistols, it comes down to how much time and money you want to spend on training and practice.

In my opinion, trigger discipline training and practice should be the same across platforms and result in safe gun handling.

To add an external safety into the mix, therefore, just increases the amount of time and money you need to spend on training so that you don't fail to deactivate it when drawing nor allow yourself to get complacent when holstering or unloading. Nothing wrong at all with this, just as long as the user knows there will be a little extra work involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
...trigger discipline training and practice should be the same across platforms and result in safe gun handling. To add an external safety into the mix, therefore, just increases the amount of time and money you need to spend on training...
OK, that drove it home for me. Thanks for knockin' the webs loose there.

I'm scared to ask about decocking levers.
 

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Whatever platform you have, with or with out safeties, it is training with that platform that eliminate your issues you raise.

I happen to like my 92FS with the de-cocking lever. It's nice to drop the hammer on a loaded chamber without having to hold the hammer, so as not to have a discharge. Compared to my1911, scary.
 
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