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Discussion Starter #1
Alright so I've come to a cross road in my life leading me to one of two paths. I am currently stuck between two different cans for my 16, the AAC M4-2000 and the Surefire SOCOM556RC. My biggest concern is noise reduction. The monetary difference is noted but not the concern I have. If you have had the pleasure of running either two what was your experience? Thanks in advance
 

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Alright so I've come to a cross road in my life leading me to one of two paths. I am currently stuck between two different cans for my 16, the AAC M4-2000 and the Surefire SOCOM556RC. My biggest concern is noise reduction. The monetary difference is noted but not the concern I have. If you have had the pleasure of running either two what was your experience? Thanks in advance
Take a serious look at the Silencerco Saker.

-SS
 

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Check out this video by Silencerco. With their own testing, the Saker didn't meter as well as the M42K. The SWR Specwar was actually the best for that test. The Saker has the modularity going for it, being able to use other adapters and endcaps. However, if sound is your priority, it's not the "best" according to Silencerco's own test. The SWR Specwar is the cheapest and built with the same stellite material as the Saker (Saker has a hoplon blast baffle).

 

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Good can?
Yes. You shouldn't dwell upon the Db averages and look more closely at individual Db readings as each report varies from can to can and round to round on the same host weapon. More often than not, DB readings from similar suppressors are so close to one another that the human ear cannot discern the difference. Look more at the number of weapons you plan to suppress and the cost associated with mounts as well as the mounting system. POI shift should be taken into account also.

-SS
 

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Yes, modularity and mounting options are necessary to look at as well. Length, weight, and build materials are also necessary to look at.

I looked at all three and I still feel that the best bang for the buck is the Saker.

The Specwar is heavier, longer, SS/Stellite solid build core, cost $550, Trifecta or muzzle brake mount only.

The M4-2000 is the lightest, shortest, SS/Iconel build and cost $868, 51T or muzzle brake mount only.

The Saker weighs between the two (closer to the M4), the length is between the two (closer to the M4), uses SS/Hoplon build which is 30% harder than Iconel, uses Trifecta, 51 Tooth (brake, hider, combo), Direct Thread, Y-Mount, Specwar Mount with many more to come, has optional caps for additional flash hider mounting (not offered by the other two), and utilizes the patented MAAD mount system. This has the most mounting options for cross platform use.

I plan on using this for multiple platforms and in the long run, it cost me the least considering the costs of the mounts that have to be added to the other platforms.

The first thing you need to do is eliminate the cost. If money is truly an issue and you will use it only on one platform then probably the Specwar should be your choice. Remove the cost and look at varied mounting options and cross platform use and I think the Saker wins hands down.

In very broad terms, the issue with the dB's is moot (no pun intended) as they all are above the long term hearing damage threshold exposure of 115 dB for a period of 15 minutes per day. Exposure to 140 dB or more causes instantaneous damage. Remember the dB's scale is not linear but logarithmic. Think earthquake where a 3 magnitude is 10 times stronger than a 2 magnitude. Energy release wise it works like this: a magnitude 1 seismic wave releases as much energy as blowing up 6 ounces of TNT. A magnitude 8 earthquake releases as much energy as detonating 6 million tons of TNT.(How Are Earthquake Magnitudes Measured?) 6 ounces to 6 million tons whereas linear growth would be 6 ounces to 48 ounces. dB's are measured with factors such as power and frequency so there is no easy explanation except that when it comes to the difference of 130dB and 133dB, it is not "hearable" to the human ear but causes more damage over the same amount of time of exposure. Either way, 130dB and 133dB will damage your hearing but you will not be able to tell the difference. The only thing the layman sees is that one is lower than the other and they think that it must be better. It's not that clear cut when you look at all the factors.

I am sure that there are other members that have a better handle on this than I do but the bottom line is that it does not matter at the levels we are talking about.
 
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