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Hi y'all, first post and first pistol purchase was my FNX9 just this afternoon. I've lurked on the forum and
researched the FN's for about 3 months before dropping the hammer (pun intended). Very pleased with
my decision even though... While I've read every post on this thread, twice, I've followed none of the
advice given here. Seriously, who can wait a week after buying a gun to shoot it :). I did sit on the couch
and rack the slide for about 45 minutes till my kids got outta school and load 2 mags but that was it, and
all the ammo I had from a previous range session with a borrowed XDM9. The ammo I had was white box
winchester 115 gn.

I had zero issues, flawless function other than grouping about 3in low @ 15 yards.
i had expected the FTF problem but it just didn't happen. Wish everyone had my kind of experience with
thiers that I had with mine.
 

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Is it detrimental to the firearm to not clean it before firing? I just bought my FNX-9 last weekend and due to complications with paperwork I was not able to take it home that day but they were gracious enough to let me fire it at their range since I had it on layaway for 2 months. They did not mention anything about cleaning it before firing or warn me in anyway. Should I be concerned?
 

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Just wanted to add that I used the gun 2 days in a row with a total round count at 324 (just got into reloading and wanted to test some of the rounds I did) all 115 grain projectiles (Fiocchi, Blazer Brass and Speer Lawman). I had 1 malfunction, and that was 1 of the Speer Lawman rounds would not chamber, I tried dropping it directly into the barrel and the slide wouldn't go into battery. When I was finished shooting I loaded the seemingly faulty round back into the mag and it chambered and fired flawlessly. No other issues with the gun, I absolutely ADORE this weapon! So smooth, accurate and well put together. As a P.S. I had a Glock 21 SF before and I got tired of the price of the ammunition and the fact that at 5 yards I couldn't make any sort of group or pattern. I don't think I will ever own another Glock. Not to mention that if you shook the gun, you could hear every internal part clanging and moving, that doesn't instill much confidence.
 

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Is it detrimental to the firearm to not clean it before firing? I just bought my FNX-9 last weekend and due to complications with paperwork I was not able to take it home that day but they were gracious enough to let me fire it at their range since I had it on layaway for 2 months. They did not mention anything about cleaning it before firing or warn me in anyway. Should I be concerned?
You should clean your new gun with Ballistol or Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber. You need to cut through the heavy packing grease that comes from the factory. I like Ballistol the best. The best lube IMO, is M-Pro 7
 

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Hello everyone,

Brand new gun owner and FNX-9 owner here. In my excitement, I decided to bypass all of the things recommended here and took it out to the range today after picking it up yesterday. Some of the more recent posts noted no problems so I thought maybe I'd be lucky and they somehow did something slightly different in the manufacturing to make it more "shoot right out of the box" ready.

I did the initial cleaning of the packing grease and let the magazines sit full and the slide racked back over night. I got about 20 shots in at the range without a malfunction but it was all downhill from there. I was shooting Aguila 124g 9mm Luger and put 100 rounds through it.

I wanted to make sure that my malfunction is a result of not having the spring/slide racked back and the magazines loaded for a week or so. I would let off a shot and then the next shot I would pull the trigger but nothing would happen, not even the hammer attempting to hit the firing pin - it behaved similar to if the gun being on safety (it wasn't). I would tap and rack and sometimes it would do the job the first time but sometimes I went two or three times of tapping and racking before a shot would be able to be let off.

I just wanted to make sure this was a malfunction that resulted from my impatience (failure to feed?) and not something actually wrong with the gun. Otherwise, the FNX-9 is very accurate and I look forward to shooting it again a week from now (after I have done the necessary prep as recommended by this thread!).
 

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Can I add a couple? Don't be one of those owners who cries because of petty problems like holster wear. (I used to be, lol) Don't be afraid to get it dirty, beat it up and to modify it. Oh, and last but not least, Find a back strap that fits you and epoxy that POS into place. :0)

It's a $400 gun not a Ming Dynasty Vase, beat that thing up and let it earn its place on your side.
Wolvee,

I just bought the .45 used it seems like a sweet pistol but the backstrap is flimsy.
what is your suggestion or the boards suggestion on gluing the backstrap?
What glue type?
brand?
prep to plastic?

i would never trust a pistol tether attached to a flimsy back strap unless it was glued permanent.

i like the flat back strap,
I am thinking Of sanding base of the backstrap flush with the rest of the magwell, it seemed to catch on the lower plastic and spread away from the grip frame.

i am thinking of roughing the interior surfaces as a prep to glue.
I would choose a two part five minute epoxy, probably even JB Weld or a Gorrila glue product .

how does everyone Permenantly affix the back strap?
thanks to all, now back to reading the thread, only a few pages in.
great to find a group so specific.
thanks,
mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #128 · (Edited)
The main complaint during initial use of a FNX/FNS-9 is 115 gr budget ammunition (inconsistent and/or lower charge weight) so many pistol manufacturers and barrel manufacturers (mainly conversion) recommend using quality, newly manufactured ammunition with 124 gr – 158 gr bullets (some cases NATO or +P). The common issues are FTF, FTE, stove pipe or failure to lock back on last round during the first 200-500 rounds based on various pistol and barrel manufacturers’ recommendations and forum experience.
The best practice is to follow the maintenance procedures in the O.M., use quality lubrication and cleaning products and quality ammunition with bullet weights of 124 gr- 158 gr with sufficient charge weight (fps/ft-lbs). It is not needed to lock-back, manually work slide if the user uses quality ammunition 124 gr- 158 gr with sufficient charge weight (fps/ft-lbs) or 115 gr above average charge weight (+P or +P+) ammo (rare). The FNX/FNS-40 rarely has first use complainants because the ammunition has a greater charge and bullet weight.
Some people only have access to 115 gr budget ammunition or that is what was purchased so some users have locked back the slide (rare) or manually worked the slide (more common) to help break-in the pistol (wear-in pistol). The other issue is improper hold “Limp Wristing” the pistol, my wife was not able to use 115gr FMJ PMC ammo but use of AE 124 gr FMJ ammo worked perfect in her new pistol. I could use the 115 gr ammo but I only shot 10 rnds so not a great test. I used a hotter 115 gr ammo to break-in her pistol with no issues.
 

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Vulcan71 said:
The main complaint during initial use of a FNX/FNS-9 is 115 gr budget ammunition (inconsistent and/or lower charge weight) so many pistol manufacturers and barrel manufacturers (mainly conversion) recommend using quality, newly manufactured ammunition with 124 gr – 158 gr bullets (some cases NATO or +P)...
Using budget ammunition is always a chancy undertaking... Quality control seems to be the main difference between the budget and more costly ammo. The cheap ammo doesn't get much QC.

Can you name a few of those "so many pistol manufacturers and barrel manufacturers" who recommend using quality, newly manufactured ammunition with "124 gr - 158 gr. bullet (including NATO or +P)" loads? Gun makers warn do against reloads, but that's the company's corporate attorneys concerned about liability. Barrel makers build barrels that allow the use of reloads when the original barrel has a polygonal design, so it makes to no sense for them to warn against reloads -- its one of their biggest markets!

I've gone through my SIG, Glock, FNH, S&W, Springfield, Sphinx, and CZ manuals and can't find any mention of what weight bullets to use or what to avoid. I've also bought and used Lone Wolf conversion and EFK Firedragon replacement barrels, and didn't come across any recommendations or warnings there -- in the materials that came with the products on on their websites.

In all my years of shooting, in participating in forums like this, and reading extensively, I don't think I've ever seen that sort of recommendation about bullet weight being made by a gun manufacturer or a barrel maker. I've certainly never seen any gun or barrel maker RECOMMEND using +P, 158 gr. 9mm ammo, or NATO loads. Some manufacturers do say +P is not a problem, but don't recommend it -- others say to avoid it -- it depends on the gun. (Some say a small amount of +P is okay, but don't recommend it as a steady diet.)

I'm not saying that sort of guidance/recommendation noted above doesn't happen, but I've never seen it, and if does exist it's not as common as your comment would seem to suggest.

I've had many guns that shot 9mm 115 gr. ammo without problems -- and while one or two didn't love Winchester White Box (budget 115 gr 9mm), neither did I. But, if WWB was the only 9mm ammo available at a reasonable price, I'd still be shooting it. (I get most of my ammo from Georgia Arms, in bulk, and it's well-made, quality, reasonably-priced ammo. Otherwise I buy in bulk from NatchezSS.com or MidwayUSA.com.)
 

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Flankenstein said:
Locking the slide back for a week...? Interesting. Pretty common knowledge that springs get weaker with use not static compression. What's the science/logic behind this advice?
Spring can deteriorate by being used. They can also deteriorate by being kept compressed. It just depends on HOW FAR they are compressed when they are worked or how deeply and long they are kept compressed.

Every spring has an elastic limit. When some mags are fully loaded (like a 1911 7-round .45 mag), that mag spring isn't CLOSE to it's elastic limit. Other hi-cap or sub-compact mags, when fully loaded, push the spring to its limit -- and left compressed, they'll deteriorate more quickly than expected. (Wolff Springs recommends downloading hi-cap mags a round or two, just to be safe -- but for some mags it would be unnecessary.)

Rohrbaugh's R9 has a recoil spring that they recommend replacing every 200-250 rounds, while full-size 9mm recoil springs may go years (and many tens of thousands of rounds) without a noticeable change in functionality. Tappet springs on older cars will cycle millions of times during a car's service life, but those springs almost never fail -- because they're never pushed beyond their design limits.

On one forum, a Army NG member said that his Guard Armory's NCOIC left all of the unit's M9 stored with the slides locked back in the late fall, and the following spring, when they were getting ready to go to the range, the gun wouldn't function properly. Had they been stored with the slide closed, they likely would have been fine. (Keeping them locked open with the springs stacked apparently did them in.)

Leaving a new mag fully loaded for a week or two will speed a slight weakening of the spring and make it more USEFUL more quickly. A new Glock mag may take longer than that!!

A few springs in new gun designs are considered renewable resources, and making springs fit in smaller areas while still doing more work means that something has to give... and it's spring life that gives.

(I've got a number of links ti technical resources on this topic, and links to discussions by very knowledgeable experts, if interested -- along with links to gun forum discussion that include comments by engineers working with metals including at least at least one metallurgist who took parts in the discussions. Springs deteriorate by being worked, but if properly designed, it'll take forever; the also deteriorate by being kept compressed -- if in that state they're near or beyond their elastic limit. It totally depends on the gun or mag design, and whether the designers are using the springs to do more than is typically the case. Springs are a new way to get extra capacity, or a smaller gun.)
 

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Brand new FNX .45 owner here, and haven't even had a chance to take her out to see what she can do yet... Still trying to get all of my cleaning kit together to get a proper clean & lube job before I start "breaking her in"... Anyway, those 15RD Magazines were UNBELIEVABLY STIFF when I started loading them (I am going to HAVE to get a Mag-Loader for those puppies), but I am sure they will get easier with time... Meanwhile, at least they can remain "primed" until my pistol is ready for practicing... I noticed that the forum has died down, so hoping more life and more FNX .45 owners can contribute their experiences here so I can compare and contrast mine with them... I will report back once I get to some tales to tell!!
 

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New member and just order a FNX9. I should have it by Friday..(strange on the delay...FN guy said due to me have a security clearance from the military 20 years ago?). Anyways look forward to getting it...I bought this pistol for the same reason I saw posted very early on in this thread...left handed but wanted something my wife could pick up and use also.. They support our troops.... and they are American made. Not to say the least the history of the company is plain awesome. I appreciate all the info this forum has provided.
 

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**** This is a safety issue reported at ranges and turning your pistol to the side will eject the cartridges at your face/head. Limp-wristing the pistol may cause function problems (reported in the forum) and can do the same thing.
Shooting Gangsta Style also make it a good bit harder to handle recoil and get back on target.

Good set of instructions for getting started!
 

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I just picked up my first pistol - the FNX 9. I did a ton of online research and now hoping I'll be satisfied. I can't wait to fire this bad boy. I have read this forum with interest am following the directions. I joined a local range but have wait a few weeks for the next safety orientation meeting before I can shoot there. I'll check in after I get to use my new toy.
 

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I just got chance to shoot my FNX9 - put 100 rounds thru it - love this pistol!!! No problems at all. I used 147 grain bullets and, as recommended, locked the slide back and loaded the mags for a full week - worked like a charm. For a first time shooter, this is accurate - managed to put all 10 rounds on a 8 x 11 pAper . I'm signing up for some lessons. Great pistol, low recoil, just a lot of fun to shoot. Thanks to all for the advice - really paid off for me.
 

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CP3 said:
Noob question- Whats the point in leaving the slide open for a week?
He answered your question, but didn't explain HOW it works.

Springs, when pushed to their design limits (also called their "elastic" limits) will degrade. Not all springs, in normal cycling will get pushed to those limits. Most recoil springs will, but it's a brief thing so it doesn't necessarily have a lot of effect. Many mag springs in high-cap mags will be pushed to or near their limits when fully loaded, and leaving them that way for extended periods causes wear. (The fully compressed spring metal develops micro-fractures and as the metal fails -- but the spring is still compressed -- adjoining metal may also fail.) Note: a fully loaded mag doesn't mean that the mag spring is fully compressed.

That's why Wolff Springs warns against the long-term storage of fully-loaded high-cap mags. (Most 7-round 1911 mags and extended length 8-round 1911 mags may be kept fully loaded for decades without problems. Other mags may not last as long.) Wolff recommends downloading a round or two for long-term storage. You don't need to do that with a mag in your carry gun. (The spring will still very slowly degrade, but you'll have extra rounds when you need them.)

Many newer gun designs are using springs as renewable resources -- to give the shooter greater capacity and replace the spring more often.

With some new FN guns, especially new FNXs when folks are using suppressors or anemic ammo, the recoil spring is too strong to cycle the slide fully with every round fired. Leaving the slide locked back for a short period (maybe a week?) will degrade the spring just just enough that it will lose a little of its strength . If you do it for that relatively short period it won't have a great effect on spring longevity. The same is true of mag springs, when new.

All coil springs will take a "set" when new, and you'll find that they are a bit shorter after some use. The spring and gun designers take this into consideration when selecting (or specifying a spring), so it's not a big concern. Leaving your slide locked back for a week or so is just accelerating "new gun break-in." You don't want to leave your slide locked back for long-term storage.
 

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I'm looking for any help finding flat floorplates for my fnx45t vs the std, I know I'll lose one round but the advantage of not printing would be great. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I've already tried several places, brownells, midway, some gunshows to no avail. Thanks in advance for letting me post.
Ps absolutely love my fnx tactical
 
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