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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Guys,

Looking for some solid advice on this one. This is a 17s barrel that has had the factory brake pinned and welded. You can barely see a faint circle and that is the location of the welded pin. This guy did great work. Now before you comment please read below because I'm sure some of your replies will be negated with the info below.

1.) No, it will not violate NFA if I remove the brake. It is a full length factory 17s barrel.
2.) I don't have access to a end mill, drill press or a machine shop.
3.) I am a pretty technical savvy guy with a hand drill and dremel with common attachments.
4.) I also have a serviceable bench vice with non marring barrel inserts.
5.) I would prefer not to use a dremel cut wheel and split the brake as I worry about going too deep and nicking the threads.

So, I ask what would be the best way for me to get this off with out trashing the barrel? I am planning on sanding over the weld spot by hand for starters just to get a look at what I'm in store for. After that I''m a little uncertain on the best option.

 

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Are you sure it has been pinned welded? By whom?

What you need are two wrenches. Turn the rear nut one direction, and the muzzle brake the other.

I've never heard of a factory brake being pinned...


EDIT: If it was welded...****ing why?
 

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I'm no Pro but you might be able to drill the pin out, you would need to put a stop collar on your bit -available at big box stores- and have a VERY good understanding where brake ends and barrel begins before drilling. If drilled close enough to the barrel I would think you could then use your vice and wrenches to muscle it off. It's also best to start with smaller bits then work your way up to larger. If brazed it'll only be brazed near the surface.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Are you sure it has been pinned welded? By whom?

What you need are two wrenches. Turn the rear nut one direction, and the muzzle brake the other.

I've never heard of a factory brake being pinned...


EDIT: If it was welded...****ing why?
Trust me when I say that it's been pinned and welded. You would be correct that it did not come from the factory this way.
 

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I researched this once trying to swap the rail on my 14.5 and stumbled on this:
Are you a Jedi Master with a Dremel??

Look how close I came to Pappabear's Noveske threads.
The tines were cut off to get them out of the way.
Jedi Master with a dremel :happyrotfl4vi0:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I researched this once trying to swap the rail on my 14.5 and stumbled on this:

Jedi Master with a dremel :happyrotfl4vi0:
I don't know that I have the testicle fortitude to to that. I have seen this method as well. Guys use a cut off wheel and sometimes split the brake with a chisel.
 

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It would indeed require an extraordinary level of testicular fortitude to perform such delicate surgery. With my suggestion I think you might not have to sacrifice the brake, not plugging my approach just sayin'...


I don't know that I have the testicle fortitude to to that. I have seen this method as well. Guys use a cut off wheel and sometimes split the brake with a chisel.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It would indeed require an extraordinary level of testicular fortitude to perform such delicate surgery. With my suggestion I think you might not have to sacrifice the brake, not plugging my approach just sayin'...
True, I just worry about the drill bit dancing around on me. I wonder if I could tap an indentation with a center punch first? I am prepared to sacrifice the brake if need be but it would be nice to save it.
 

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You will definitely need to use a center punch first then starting with a small bit working your way up to a larger. I wouldn't think you'd need to drill all the way through just deep enough to thin the pin enough to muscle it out with wrenches. I would also suggest using a penetrant such as JB Blaster before you attempt to wrench. If you have a propane or MAP torch (also available at big box stores for less the $30) it might help. It'd be nice if Sarge would chime in...


True, I just worry about the drill bit dancing around on me. I wonder if I could tap an indentation with a center punch first? I am prepared to sacrifice the brake if need be but it would be nice to save it.
 

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You can cut the brake almost to the threads leaving a thin layer of steel remaining over the threads and then break that thin layer by wedging the slot open with a chisel or large screw driver from the end rather than the perpendicular angle.

I have done several old post-ban ARs and AKs from the 90s that way and never touched the threads.
 

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bubba j just got a new set of cutting torches a new hacksaw and a 5 lb. Sledgehammer he says he can get it off for you :-D
Sounds legit.
 
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I believe it was me I would have someone qualified remove it for you I would hate to see you mess up an expensive barrel
 

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I would recommend the following be purchased to accomplish the job. Kroll Oil or some other super penetrating oil. Little Propane torch. Proper sized long wrench. Little Dremel stone bit that you can control and lastly something you can use in a vise that will not let the barrel spin or move when wrenching it. The longer the wrench the more leverage and easier it is to accomplish.

You can try to drill it but unless you have a drill press I won't recommend it. I would sacrifice the break. This is what I have done personally and it worked out great. First I soaked the area in Kroll oils and let it penetrate. Then I used the blow torch and heated the area and then added more Kroll oil. (this way if rockiest was used I started to break it down. I then very carefully used the stone bit to sand down the metal. Here is the key! Sand down then heat up the brake and use the wrench. What happened was the muzzle break split and I never touched the threads. Just keep sanding, heating, and wrenching.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I would recommend the following be purchased to accomplish the job. Kroll Oil or some other super penetrating oil. Little Propane torch. Proper sized long wrench. Little Dremel stone bit that you can control and lastly something you can use in a vise that will not let the barrel spin or move when wrenching it. The longer the wrench the more leverage and easier it is to accomplish.

You can try to drill it but unless you have a drill press I won't recommend it. I would sacrifice the break. This is what I have done personally and it worked out great. First I soaked the area in Kroll oils and let it penetrate. Then I used the blow torch and heated the area and then added more Kroll oil. (this way if rockiest was used I started to break it down. I then very carefully used the stone bit to sand down the metal. Here is the key! Sand down then heat up the brake and use the wrench. What happened was the muzzle break split and I never touched the threads. Just keep sanding, heating, and wrenching.
I was with you until you said that the "muzzle break split". What made it split?

For the price that it would cost to get this done by my smith I could probably buy a O.K. drill press. Then I could get it done for the same price and have the drill press. I don't think that I would need a monster one to do it. Maybe a 8' bench top 5 speed press and carbide bits?
 

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