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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, perhaps there is another thread somewhere on this, but with ammo prices just getting out of hand lately I've pondered reloading.

What advice do people have for doing reloading. Lets assume I want to do it right, and set myself up with decent equipment and have the least amount of chance to screw up. Oh, and be able to produce a good number of rounds.

I was thinking one of the multi-stage units, but which brand?

Basically, does someone have the 'Reloading for Dummies' guide?

FM
 

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Not sure where you live but check with the NRA to see if theres an instructor in your area. We have one and I live in a town of 1500. Our local instuctor only charges what the course materials cost ie. $10

As for presses if its for hand gun ammo I would go with a progessive. I use a Dillon 550b which is an easy to use trouble free machine. I just pumped out 500 9mm rds in about 2.5 hrs.

If it's for rifle ammo you will get many different opinions and it also kinda depends on what rifle you are reloading for! When I reload for the fs 2000
I use the dillon because the FS 2000 is for spraying bullets not pin point accuracy, but when I start reloading for my FNAR I will use my RCBS rock chucker single stage. When and if you take a course you will quickly see why I use a single stage for precision rifle ammo. There is a lot more to rifle ammo then pistol ammo.

Hope this helped
 

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loading , entry level?

The best way to start into the loading experience is to find yourself a good loading manual and start reading.. I used to recomend that a novice start with a single stage press and learn the operations in a slow step by step progression. This is good if your not to mechanically oriented. Ive since decided that the Dillon 550 is just as easy to start with by using it as a single stage if needed and advancing to the progressive mode when your comfort or skill and understanding of whats transpiring is not a concern.

Pistol loading is a good place to start, the brass is not as critical to deal with at first as the trim and headspace specs of rifle loading requires. NO matter what you do, buy quality and you buy only once. I've been using the same equipment for up to 40 years in some instances.

If you shoot much at all, IT WILL pay for its self in a very short time. I find the best deals a the gun shows for primers and sometimes powder, no frt or hazmat costs, used equipment is a good thing if you can find deals. Balance beam scales are accurate and can be leveled and checked as needed (no batterys or elec interference either) a scale is mandatory.. Once again, get the book and READ it. You should have some idea of whether reloading is for you when you have digested all the info that will be presented.

There are a lot of us out here that will help as needed, just dont trust every rope that some one throws you. Verify!!

Al N...SOF
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So I see most people are recommending Dillon, why are these recommended over say Hornaday or RCBS?

FM
 

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I had a Hornady progressive for years. It worked well. I would consider the current version if I was in the market. I also used a Redding single stage for utility work. I used a Redding benchrest powder measure and mostly Redding and Dillon dies. Dillon appears to have refined their presses in some weak areas. The bigger Dillons have lots of add ons to make reloading large quantities a breeze. That can get pretty costly though.

Theres plenty of good books. I had older versions of the Hornady and Lyman manuals they were very informative. The Lyman had more info for beginners in simpler terms. Im not sure what the current books contain.

http://www.lymanproducts.com/lyman/publications/49th-edition.php

Reloading is very gratifying.
 

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I have a progressive RCBS. Brand name is just another word for "replacement parts". Eventually, you will need replacement parts for your reloader. Pick a brand (RCBS, Dillon, Lee) that has been around for a while and buy what you need, not what you want. If you buy what you want, you'll spend years paying it off in savings.

As an example, I've reloaded literally hundreds of thousands of rounds and only had to replace two decapper pins and one gasket on the progressive press. It's more of a hobby than a money saver unless you police your own brass (and other peoples brass) because there is a considerable amount of time associated with reloading (checking brass for failures, cleaning brass, sizing brass, trimming brass, checking powder throws, double checking powder throws, and so on). It's not for the impatient to be sure. I use reloading as a way to get "alone". My wife knows to leave me alone whilst reloading as it is very attention oriented. It's good for some quiet time and to save a little money on the hobby of shooting.

I'd recommend against it if you are impatient or are looking for the soul purpose of saving money. I've spent so much on reloading supplies and the time to do it, I often wonder what the financial benefits are. Then I realize that it's just more of another hobby to me and I feel good about the decision.

Personally, I shoot about 800-1200 rounds a month in various calibers, so it does actually save me some money, but it does cost some time, and as we all know, time is very valuable. I don't have kids so it's just the wife and I's time that is getting put towards it... take that into consideration.

I'd say that a typical reloading session probably occupies about 2-4 hours of my time. If you don't have the time to spare, you might be better off just buying bulk.

Zhur
 

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to Zhurdans point on economics. Back when I was reloading 5.56 ammo was cheap enough that I rarely bothered reloading for it unless i wanted some "special" rounds. The bulk of my reloading was .45acp,7.62x51 and 22-250.




Patience and no distractions cant be stressed enough.
 
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