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With the continuously rising of not only factory ammo, and components for reloading, I decided to invest in the dies to roll my own jacketed bullets in .22 (22-250) and .243.

These dies will work on the RCBS Rockchucker and like single stage presses. They will not work on a progressive press. So, unless you already have s sturdy press, you will need to invest in one.

I did some number crunching and I can roll my own bullet for about 1.2 cents, rather than the 14 to 25 cents made commercially. Depending on how much shooting you do will determine how long it will take to recover your costs.

Since I also do a lot of 22lr shooting, I also invested in the drawing dies that will make jackets for .22 (5.7) and 243, out of the spent .22lr cases. So now, the jackets will be free and the only cost for components is the lead which works out to about 1.2 cents each.

Now, since the jackets made from 22lr cases are rather thin, and their ballistics are unknown, I would still carry factory bullets. But for range work, they will be good enough.

http://corbins.com/index.htm

Chris
 

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I have done some research on this subject as well. Here are my insights and conjectures:

It is my understanding, from others who have the .224 bullet swage kits that the bullets produced are capable of sub MOA groups in the right rifle. I don't know what rifle is the "right" rifle. I hope that the round is fairly flexible twist rate wise.

The terminal ballistics of these rounds is explosive. The thin jacket makes them frangible. They make excellent varmint and target rounds and perhaps even good home defense rounds since they limit overpenetration through walls and such. I have never seen a table of penetration depths in different materials. This is just the information I have found from users. It does not escape my attention that this is ideal for use in a 5.7 since the ATF would approve.

As for actually producing 5.7 vs .223 rounds I think it could be done but here is the hitch. Because of the length of the jacket I understand the ideal weight for this round is around 52-65 grains. It is my understanding this is to heavy for the 5.7. I do not own or reload 5.7 I'm actually not a 5.7 fan (I know sacrilege please don't ban me :oops: ) . Anyhow, to get the lighter shorter round you will need you will definitely want to trim the .22lr case down in length. I think a case trimmer could be retrofitted to do this nicely and quickly. Obviously you would use a motorized one that attaches to a drill since you will need to trim allot off. The hitch will be the shell holder for the case trimming. Most take rcbs button type but there is also the LE wilson trimmer which I think might be a strong contender. You will probably have to design your own holder and have a machine shop turn it. The LE wilson would be really easy to have machined since any gunsmith already has the .22lr reamer that would be ideal for the internal diameter. I don't know if a gunsmith could make the piece fully from 1 inch bar stock stainless or if you would need a machinist as well but a few calls and you could figure it out. Just thinking about it makes me wish I cared for .5.7 since it sounds like a fun project.

Lastly there is the question of whether or not the die that forms the oglave tip produces a shape that when the round is shortened allows ample base on the round to seat into the neck of the 5.7 case. It is my expectation that this will not be a problem. However, I would run it by corbin before you buy the dies since they are around $780. Keep in mind that corbin has the ability to make custom pieces himself. He has a full machine shop. For instance, if you wanted a core mold to make the 5.7 cores from molten lead he could easily make one.

Hope all the info helps. Obviously this stuff very much interests me.
 
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