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I am researching cleaning rifle barrels and it seems that aluminum rods are a bad idea. There also seems to be a lot of talk about what to use and not to use or you will ruin your barrel.

This is more a question for the people who are very picky about maintaining barrel accuracy.

What is the absolute safest way to clean the scar barrel?


What is the best rod to use and should it be coated, carbon, stainless, etc.?


Should I use a bore guide when running a rod through the barrel?


If you can give the brand names of the above recommend items that will be helpful.

Thankyou
 

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I've graduated from rod with patch to bore snake, just my current cleaning practice, although I do wonder how a slight tap of a rod against the interior of a barrel can be more offensive to the barrel than a metal projectile flying through it at faster than the speed of sound (those who know more about physics feel free to destroy this statement)
 

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Another vote for the Dewey coated rods, with an aluminum jag and nylon bore brushes. I use a Sinclair International rod guide for my 16, I do not think they make one for a 17. I too have long-range shooting cleaning habits carrying over.
 

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+1 boresnake, easy cleaning, and safe

Sent from my KFJWI using Tapatalk HD
 
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I've graduated from rod with patch to bore snake, just my current cleaning practice, although I do wonder how a slight tap of a rod against the interior of a barrel can be more offensive to the barrel than a metal projectile flying through it at faster than the speed of sound (those who know more about physics feel free to destroy this statement)
It's not so much the bore itself. It's the mouth (throat area) and the crown that have the most influence on any given barrel's performance.

...or lack thereof.

-SS
 

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I use deweys and a boresnake depending on whats going on. On the boresnake you have to be real careful to keep it clean (I keep it in the original hard plastic case) also you need to wash them frequently. You wouldn't re-use patches, you shouldn't use a dirty boresnake either. I just throw mine in with the rags that I have to wash weekly or every 2 weeks.
 

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Unless you jam your cleaning rod down the tube after every shot, you aren't going to do much damage to it.
 
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Most rods are not a problem. Barrels are made of steel, and an aluminum rod or a brass jag won't bother it. Similarly, I'd expect a one-piece stainless rod is pretty harmless because you only generate minimal perpendicular force between the rod and the barrel.

What you do NOT want are the military multi-piece steel rods. The edges where they screw together are moving parallel to the bore, so an edge moving across either the crown of the muzzle or the throat can generate enough force that you could scratch the steel barrel.

I recall from the olden days of engineering school that for a good cutting tool, you want the tool to be about 3x the hardness of the material being cut so that the cutting tool will not wear.

Steel has hardness numbers in the Vickers 500 range, Brass and Aluminum have hardness in the Vickers 100 range, so with 5x the difference, your steel barrel is just not going to wear measurably when it runs against aluminum or brass rods/jags.

Oh, the other one to avoid is there were some WWII surplus that had pull through chains with little steel links. Those would be very bad.

My personal preference is the Dewey plastic coated steel rods. Single piece, so you have no edges, and strong enough that you can make it so thin to leave room for a plastic coating.
 

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Dewey coated rods are all I use on all weapons.

Plastic brush, wrapped with a patch, always.

I'm an old school long range guy and good habits die hard.

-SS
I second this! Dewey's coated rods is all I use - even on my bench guns. Bore guides by Sinclair's for a Kimber 84 30cal slips in there just fine. A Sinclair jag, and patches with Butch's Bore shine and it's clean as glass in just a few passes. (and don't forget that chamber!! Clean it, and then Teflon coat it with Tetra Gun oil and then wipe it all out. Cleans up soooo quickly the next time.)
 

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Most rods are not a problem. Barrels are made of steel, and an aluminum rod or a brass jag won't bother it. Similarly, I'd expect a one-piece stainless rod is pretty harmless because you only generate minimal perpendicular force between the rod and the barrel.

What you do NOT want are the military multi-piece steel rods. The edges where they screw together are moving parallel to the bore, so an edge moving across either the crown of the muzzle or the throat can generate enough force that you could scratch the steel barrel.

I recall from the olden days of engineering school that for a good cutting tool, you want the tool to be about 3x the hardness of the material being cut so that the cutting tool will not wear.

Steel has hardness numbers in the Vickers 500 range, Brass and Aluminum have hardness in the Vickers 100 range, so with 5x the difference, your steel barrel is just not going to wear measurably when it runs against aluminum or brass rods/jags.

Oh, the other one to avoid is there were some WWII surplus that had pull through chains with little steel links. Those would be very bad.

My personal preference is the Dewey plastic coated steel rods. Single piece, so you have no edges, and strong enough that you can make it so thin to leave room for a plastic coating.
I think the cause for concern with respect to aluminum is that aluminum oxide is VERY abrasive and any piece of aluminum exposed to air is literally covered in the stuff, so depending on the direction and amount of force, one could score the barrel with the softer aluminum, much like sand paper attached to a piece of wood can be used to score steel pipe. The abrasive particles (sand) are harder than the steel.
 

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Bore snake 22 cal oh man so quick no headaches.
Why would you use a 22 cal bore snake - rather than 30 cal? Do any of you have major concerns about using a bore snake? I use them to clean everything - the SCAR doesn't need better treatment does it?
 

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Borescope tells me everything I need to know.

What I see looking thru a barrel as opposed to what I see looking at the bore @ a 90 degree angle are very different.

Dewey coated rod, patch wrapped around a nylon brush.

KG12 for copper, & Remington 40X for carbon.

-SS
 

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Why would you use a 22 cal bore snake - rather than 30 cal? Do any of you have major concerns about using a bore snake? I use them to clean everything - the SCAR doesn't need better treatment does it?
I saw a study between a good scrubbing and a bore snaking. Bore snake just didn't seem to have the ability to clean as well. I now only use boresnakes when I need to run a quick patch through without disassembly. Or in my 10/22 where you can't use a rod properly. Other than that its all dewey all the time. And whoever asked about vfg, I use those to clean the chambers only. And not that often.
 
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A piece of hot lead travels through the bore everytime the rifle is fired, how is cleaning going to do more damage than that?
 

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Borescope tells me everything I need to know.

What I see looking thru a barrel as opposed to what I see looking at the bore @ a 90 degree angle are very different.

Dewey coated rod, patch wrapped around a nylon brush.

KG12 for copper, & Remington 40X for carbon.

-SS
Hawkeye Borescope is such a good investment, I highly praise this tool for the info it gives to the eye!
 
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A piece of hot lead travels through the bore everytime the rifle is fired, how is cleaning going to do more damage than that?
I use to think the same way, up until one of the most respected barrel manufacturers in the country shared his plethora of knowledge with me. I credit Boots Obermeyer for generously shared knowledge - over the 20 years I've known him.

Something as simple as allowing the cleaning rod to fall out of the barrel on the drive stroke and touch the crown will degrade accuracy, over time (multiply the action 1000's X). Now, the old 'push-pull' technique only exacerbates the issue. Same thing happens at the throat area where the rifling begins.

Boresnakes are simply ineffective at removing copper fouling at the land/groove juncture. Sure it may look clean to the eye but it's not.

I recall somebody suggesting using nylon panty hose years ago tied in knots. The effect was the same. More copper fouling left behind leads to more jacket deformation which leads to inconsistent projectile launch, which obviously leads to the weapon not shooting to its greatest potential.



-SS
 
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