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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been lurking in the seal threads for awhile but never committed to pre ordering one because well...it didn't seem like they'd ever ship to those who did lol. But now that I see people actually getting theirs I would be willing to plunk down the change for one, are they "in stock" for those who didn't preorder them? I'd rather get the seal over the handl, but if it's gonna take another year to get more in stock I'll pass. Thanks for the info!!
 

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I don't know Jim or work for any firearms company. But I have worked in manufacturing aircraft and automotive parts in the past and I can tell you the time is in the design, getting the CNC machining worked out and in the other processing like the hard coat anodizing. Once that is done, the lead time for the first batch is reduced substantially for all subsequent batches.

My wild guess bet would be the Stryker S.E.A.L.s will be 1-2 months lead time on new orders just because the demand is going to be higher than expected. They really are that good. Expectations were high and judging by the quality of mine, those expectations have been met and exceeded. Word of mouth from satisfied customers will keep the S.E.A.L.s in demand by those in the know for a long time to come.

I don't think I saw the material selection talked about, but I can tell you my S.E.A.L. is made from 70-series aircraft grade aluminum, probably 7075. I know this because I built the Lockheed C5B's in the 1980's and handled a lot of aluminum aircraft parts. Most people would use a 60 series aluminum like 6061 because it is cheaper and faster to machine. But it is not as strong as a 70 series.
 

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Best bet is to contact Jim directly, though I doubt there will be any "in stock" for newly placed orders until he clears the existing pre-orders. He seems pretty determined to ship in the order they were received (based on the color and mod, of course). Looking at how hard he seems to be working to expedite assembling, packing, and shipping SEALs & swag, I'd bet he'll be hard to get hold of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the good info, it looks like ill be picking one up here fairly soon, they seem pretty nice. I think it would be nice though to have a polymer lower to take pmags
 

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Let me echo mityno1 and kneedeep - the Black PMAG SEAL variant I received is a beautifully designed and manufactured piece of hardware that was well worth the wait from my perspective. Now I have the magazine interchangeability I've been wanting, and if I ever decide I need to switch back - I still have the original factory polymer lower and can switch it out in under a minute. They are swamped at the moment getting orders out - but will respond to emails. I sent them an email a couple of weeks back on another matter and they got back to me in about a week.
 
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I cannot speak from personal experience about any other brand lower. All I know about them is what I have read or seen on the internets. It is impossible for any product or to not have some detractors at some point. The key is to evaluate the complaints and the source of the complaints. Is the complaint relevant to me and how I will use the product and is the complainer someone at my level of knowledge and skill level or greater or are they an idiot or a person with an agenda, like a tool or troll for a competing product?

With that said, I bought into the Scar 17 because it's primary complaints are price and at one time availability. Otherwise the Scar 17 is the Lite-est production .308 battle rifle employed by many military and police agencies around the planet that is at least as accurate and reliable as any of the great .308 battle rifles that preceded it, if not more accurate and reliable. There is a secondary weakness in that the Scar 17's pencil barrel is not designed for sustained long streams of rapid fire, but that is just not how I would ever employ my Scar 17 so it is a non-issue to me.

So it is from this perspective that I sought a PMAG conversion lower where I want the lower to at least match my Scar 17's quality and reliability. Since the Scar 17 is the best production .308 battle rifle ever offered to civilians in my not so humble opinion, I wanted the equivalent best aftermarket lower to compliment it, even if that meant waiting a few months to get one. It wasn't like my Scar 17 would not run without it, in fact my Scar 17 runs perfectly on the OEM lower and FN Scar mags.

Now, after having waited for the first batch of civilian version S.E.A.L.'s to be manufactured and my pre-order to be shipped, I have the optional choice of which lower and which mags I will run at any given time. I have half a dozen FN mags and will likely never buy any more because I can buy at least two PMAGs for the cost of one FN mag and I hope to buy a Desert Tech MDR when they are released which will also use the same PMAGs. It also gives me the option of buying or building AR styled .308's in the future that share the same PMAGs. Call me weird, but magazine commonality will be an important consideration for me in all of my future purchases. And it is unlikely that any other rifle will use the FN Scar 17 magazines for many years to come, if ever.
 

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I don't think I saw the material selection talked about, but I can tell you my S.E.A.L. is made from 70-series aircraft grade aluminum, probably 7075. I know this because I built the Lockheed C5B's in the 1980's and handled a lot of aluminum aircraft parts. Most people would use a 60 series aluminum like 6061 because it is cheaper and faster to machine. But it is not as strong as a 70 series.
really? how do you know this? did you have it chemically tested or did you read it on strykers website? we are talking about replacing a part that was plastic. it could be made from soda cans and be "stronger" even though the plastic lowers really dont have a strength problem.
 

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No, I have nothing but the subjective "feel" and "ring" of the material when I handle it... but I look forward to having my observations confirmed or disproved because like a lot of what I post, I post this personal observation to be challenged so that confirmed information becomes available to the Scar community. I have no dog in the fight one way or the other.

I do want to add that all of my Scar 17 logic is predicated on this philosophy, "If I can have only one rifle, my Scar 17 is that rifle." This is because it is the Lite-est, most reliable, most widely versatile mass-produced by a Tier-I manufacturer, rifle in a common NATO round that can accurately shoot targets at close and at considerable ranges and can easily ethically take deer sized game.
 

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Beekeeping1341,

They are being made, P-Mag version first. Black anodized one's are the first to ship, as FDE is going through anodizing.

If you want one, order it now to get in line.
 

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really? how do you know this? did you have it chemically tested or did you read it on strykers website? we are talking about replacing a part that was plastic. it could be made from soda cans and be "stronger" even though the plastic lowers really dont have a strength problem.
Aluminum billet 7075-T6511, hard coat anodized, MIL-A-8625F Type III Class 2, with nickel acetate sealed for corrosion resistance.

Are you going to chemically test it??? You think he is lying???
 
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Stryker has always maintained that there is nothing wrong with the factory polymer lower.

However he has added some refinements, that grew out of development of a lower that would take a P-Mag.
 
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Aluminum billet 7075-T6511, hard coat anodized, MIL-A-8625F Type III Class 2, with nickel acetate sealed for corrosion resistance.

Are you going to chemically test it??? You think he is lying???
The C5B wing structure is predominately 7075 that is age hardened to T6511, as I would guess most modern aluminum heavy jet wings are as well. That is because it is one of the strongest common aluminum alloys with many other good to excellent qualities.

6061 is the most common industrial aluminum alloy and is still used in non-critical aircraft assemblies because it is easier to machine and less expensive. 6061 age hardened to just common T-6 with would make a fine lower and I would not be surprised if some of the other brands of lowers use it because like I say, it is a satisfactory material for this purpose.

7075 T-6511 is more about that extra attention to detail and no expense being spared or cut corners or shave a few bucks off of production costs. It is the difference in a V6 Charger and a V8 Hellcat, both will get you to the grocery store and back, but it's what's under the hood people can't see that makes the difference to those in the know.
 
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