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"as long as one occupant consents" not seeing the big deal here bro.

I'm not worried about some gang-banging robber going to jail because his old lady had some gumption.
 

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I agree that in the case presented in the article it isn't really a big deal and in fact it should have worked out like it did. However, it seems like a slippery slope to me. I know most of us have no reason for the police to show up at our doors so it seems pretty inconsequential. It seems, however, that they're leaving the definition of occupant wide open. "Alito said police were free to search when they get the consent of the only occupant on site." It seems that with this precedent, a roommate could give the police consent to search your property while you're gone, or perhaps a child playing in the front yard. Just seems like one more sliver of privacy given up for the greater good.
 

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But, the police would need a warrant to search a sub renter's room that he or she pays rent. So if I own an apartment and I sub rent to another person a room, the police can only search, warrantless, in their area only that I reside in.

Honestly, I have not read the entire article but the above has been my professional experience.

Ok, I just read the article. I do not see any infringement or damage to our 4th Amendment Right. In the case exampled, the female appeared to have been physically assaulted so it became an emergency situation. Also, it sounded like the female was the sole legal occupant in the home that had all the right to allow police entry.

As I see it, a POS gang banger has been placed where he belongs, in prison.
 

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What if the occupant is under 18, a neighbor house sitting, or a baby sitter. IMHO, they don't have the authority to consent to a search of my property. Honestly, if they arrested Fernandez for the robbery how hard would it be for them to get a warrant. Seems like laziness to me.
 

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Riddle me this, batman. What is a 'reasonable search or seizure'.

Who defines this? When?

The founders screwed up on this one big time in my opinion because this is rather loose language. This language has allowed us to slide down this slope so far, that this ruling is of no surprise at all.
 

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What if the occupant is under 18, a neighbor house sitting, or a baby sitter. IMHO, they don't have the authority to consent to a search of my property. Honestly, if they arrested Fernandez for the robbery how hard would it be for them to get a warrant. Seems like laziness to me.
Some cases police do not have the luxury to take the time for a warrant when they have probable cause to go the the house. The homeowner authorized entry to police and the suspect was arrested. In some cases, their are exigent circumstances and time is of the essence. Let's say, god forbid, a family member of yours was victimized and the suspect ran into a house. Would you want the police to attempt immediate apprehension through the homeowners permission or wait for a warrant?
 

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Not a good day.

People are people regardless of profession, and in some cases, men who have sworn to uphold the law will use the ruling to state the person(s) agreed to "may we come in and take a look around?" when quite the contrary is the case.

Do lawyers lie? Yes.

Do politicians lie? Yes.

Do judges lie? Yes.

Do spouses lie to one another? Yes.

Do kids lie? Yes.

Do police lie? Yes.

You get where I'm going on this one.

And in the case of the robber, well, his GF could have stepped out with the cops if she was fearful of the punk thief.

-SS
 
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