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I recently purchased 120 rounds of Samco .308 before I did the research to determine whether or not it was a corrosive cartridge. Big mistake on my part. Fortunately, I didn't spend much $ on this ammo. My question is: What are everyone's feelings about running this corrosive garbage through my prized 17S? In all honesty, I'm well prepared to just accept this lapse in judgement, learn from it, and consider these rounds a lost cause unless the more knowledgeable members here can "convince" me otherwise. I'm aware that a good cleaning immediately after firing this ammo is a necessity, but I'm still hesitant to even run these rounds through such a gorgeous (and expensive) rifle. Any and all thoughts and/or advice is greatly appreciated. Cheers.
 

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I say buy a cheap gun for the cheap, corrosive ammo. Don't muck up the SCAR.

Edit: The only guns I've ever put corrosive ammo through are my Mosin Nagants. The two of the together cost me less than $100.00 twenty years ago.
 

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If your okay with eating the cost of the ammo then do what feels most comfortable to you, which I assume is not firing it. However, corrosive ammo is not an instant destructor of guns. Just rinse it out when you get it home, as stated above, then clean as you normally would.
 

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He's going to have to go swimming with the weapon disassembled in order to flush that crap out of every nook and cranny...
 

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I 2nd that! I shoot corrosive in my cheap com block guns and no mater how much you wash,flush, rinse your going to get rust some where! Do you really want to find out something like the bolts that hold your barrel in have rusted or have fatigued because of cheap ammo?
 

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He's going to have to go swimming with the weapon disassembled in order to flush that crap out of every nook and cranny...
Yep. Would not want to push that stuff through the gas system and have to pull that thing apart all the time. Much less any creeping back into the lower receiver parts. The firing pin on these guns are $35 and its the cheapest thing on the gun outside of gas rings and a couple springs. No thanks.
 

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He's going to have to go swimming with the weapon disassembled in order to flush that crap out of every nook and cranny...
You mean you don't go SCUBA diving with your SCAR on a regular basis???? Amatuer:?:...

If your single, you can always put it in the dishwasher.... don't recommend this if a wife is involved
 

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Three words: why invite trouble...?
 

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Take it to a gun show and dump it off to some ******* with a Century CETME. Don't shoot that crap in your SCAR... 101
 

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101,

The acid in the paper (cardboard boxes) reacted with the brass, and resulted in the less than perfect finish on the cartridges. I've fired the Port stuff after cleaning the cartridges without issue. For 36 cents a round - practice ammo, I'll buy a couple cases of it myself. That stuff sure beats shooting steel cased ammunition!
 

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Most all military ammo started life as corrosive ammo and millions of weapons survive today becasue of proper cleaning. I fire and have fired a LOT of corrosive ammo without any bad side effects. My Sharps rife next to Czech silvertip 7.62X54R is the most corrosive stuff I have ever seen and its still easily handles by proper cleaning. If your firing an autoloader its more work to clean the gas ports and tubes Vs a bolt rifle but its not bad.

Simple soapy water (cold or hot) works wonders. Hot water only evaporates faster and does not add much to the cleaning process. I use Balistol to clean black powder and corrosive military ammo. Some corrosive ammo is actually pretty clean firing, its the mercuric salts in the priming that attracts moisture and starts the corrosion process.

Also your environment has a role in corrosion. In Ohio we average 60% humidity. There is moisture in the ambient air to start corrosion if left unattended. In a state like Arizona where the relative humidity is a lot lower corrosion happens at a much slower pace and you have more of a window to do a proper cleaning. If your down south with 100% humidity I dont know how you can enjoy shooting anything corrosive or not........
 

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....and hundreds of millions of weapons do not survive today due to corrosive ammunition. We're not discussing a $10 Enfield here...

-SS
 
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