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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought an FNP-40 DA/SA with the black slide today. Haven't had a chance to shoot it yet, but took it down and cleaned it well tonight. Dry fired it and I really like the way it handles and the feel of the trigger. This is my first DA/SA and I like the idea of having a true double action pull for the first shot. I loaded a magazine and chambered a round. The feed angle is almost straight in, with very little assist from the feed ramp, so it is very slick when it feeds. Takedown and reassembly is the easiest of any of the pistols that I own.

Will try to shoot it tomorrow. If function and accuracy are ok, then this may well become my primary carry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Went to the range today. 150 rounds through the FNP-40, all flawless. 100 rounds of 180 grain WWB and 50 rounds of 165 grain Federal Hydrashok. Shot a box of WWB first and then the Hydrashok to see how it would feed JHP's after getting a little dirty. No problems.

Collected a few spent casings and inspected them. Primer strikes were centered and deep. Casing showed no bulging at 6:00 as I often see with spent casings from the Glock, so the casings appear to be well supported in the chamber.

Groups were good for me with a .40 S&W at 7, 10 and 15 yards (indoor range that only goes to 15 yards). Made headshots easily at 7 yards. I was printing a little left during rapid fire, but that's normal for me until I figure out the trigger and how much finger to use on each gun. Did the same thing at first with my Glock 23 and M&P 9. The gun shot to POA at all distances when I did my part.

Initial impression is that I much prefer the FNP to my Glock 23. Feels a little softer shooting, points more naturally and is much more comfortable to shoot, resulting in more consistent grouping of shots than I generally get with my Glock. Only a couple of fliers early and after that everything settled into nice groups. DA and SA triggers are smooth, with minimal stacking before the break. A little take up in SA, but not an excessive amount. Feeding is slick, as I expected considering the relatively straight feed angle. The first round chambers easily even if you ride the slide forward.

I must say that I've already gained a lot of confidence in this weapon. It gives all indications of being absolutely reliable and it is a pleasure to shoot. Won't hesitate to carry it.
 

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FN aims to please ;)

i wonder though: do you guys often shoot at 7 & 10 yards? in most belgian gunclubs, the minimal range at which we shoot pistols is around 12 to 15 meters. most often we shoot 25 meters for higher calibre weapons (meaning by that above .22 or longer than snubbies).


(this might of course be CCW/homedefense related, as you're more likely to fire at close range, i realise that)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My experience is that the majority of pistol shooters in the U. S. practice for self defense scenarios, which generally occur inside of 7 yards. The typical Pistol Qualification Course for Law Enforcement in the U. S. is 50 to 60 rounds, with 12 to 18 rounds fired at 25 yards from behind barricades or from the prone position. The rest will be standing or kneeling offhand at 15, 7 and 3 yards. At each distance the shooter shoots several sequences of shots from different configurations and within alloted times. The sequences can include standing, kneeling, prone, strong and weak hand only, strong and weak side barricade, etc. At 3 yards the weapon is generally fired from below eye level, often from hip level. The weapon is safed and returned to the holster after each sequence, therefore each sequence requires the weapon to be drawn, readied and fired within the alloted time.

All sequences are timed, with around 1.5 seconds per shot allowed from 7 yards or closer and slightly longer at 15 and 25 yards. At each distance there will be at least one sequence that requires a tactical reload to be accomplished within the alloted time. This type of training puts a premium on safe gun handling, rapid deployment of the weapon and reasonably accurate shooting from different positions and distances. It requires good trigger control, but is not target shooting. At the closer distances you either can't use your sights or often don't have time to get a perfect sight picture. Its point/front sight/trigger/recover and repeat.

Its actually a lot of fun, but you go through ammo quickly when you're practicing.
 
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