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In another post which talked about old stock, I mentioned that I bought a new FNS-9 with a SS slide and manual safety last week from Bud's. It had a fired case date of April 2013. I was concerned about the locking slide issue when the trigger is pushed forward.

It does seem to do that but if I keep trying to move the slide back and forth is does come back eventually. I cleaned the gun yesterday. I gave it a good cleaning and inspected everything carefully. With the slide off I was looking at the frame and trigger movement. I moved the trigger back and forth to see what parts moved and how they could effect the slide.

My question to anyone who knows is, if you took a current production one and compared it to an older one and looked at the trigger components what is different that it won't stop the slide from moving back if the trigger is pushed forward. Also what would the factory do to mine to fix the issue if I wanted them to.
Thanks
 

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I don't know that you can find what was changed without a micrometer, and if you send it in, they'll likely replace the whole FCG, though unless someone here can testify otherwise, I've only heard of FN warrantying for the issue if it causes a complete failure and the slide cannot be cycled without unhooking the edge of the trigger safety from the frame (the whole "issue" is caused by the Glock-style trigger safety snagging the frame when you manually forward the trigger to far, causing a slight torquing of the FCG); otherwise, the two people that I know that could still cycle the slide to alleviate the jam were told that it was such a minor issue that it didn't warrant repair.

I personally have a first-run bi-tone from 2012; it locks up when the trigger is manually forwarded, and it unlocks when the slide is cycled, and since I have absolutely no reason to push my trigger forward, I could absolutely care less. I'm aware of the one-in-a-billion chance of it occurring when I need the weapon, and I could still care less because if it does, I'll either slip my finger behind the trigger to disengage the trigger safety from the frame and apply a smidge of pressure to the trigger to bring the firearm back into service, or I'll do the same thing I would if I run into the 1:10,000 chance of a round having a bad primer...

I'll cycle the slide.
 
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