FN Herstal Firearms banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, here goes. I tried to take a lot of pictures throughout the process, but, as you will see, as I got further into the process I focused more on cutting and sanding than I did on documenting. I didn't take any pictures of reassembly either but it is rather obvious by that point and I will do my best to explain it. The important parts are here.

First things first: you need to acquire the picatinny rail/ejection port tube housing piece from a tactical model. There are people on this board who can facilitate that. Don't call Browining - they want over $700 for the parts. It cost me a bit over $400. Pricey, yes. Worth it? Well, to me, it was, especially since I got to turn the weapon into a project and make this tutorial.

Next, you need to understand that you will be cutting, dremeling, sanding, and otherwise modifying the upper receiver of your rifle. This was extremely scary, to say the least. I did this with an old, bent, worn out hand saw and a cordless dremel. It was not an optimal situation, but I was a jarhead in a past life so I am used to making do with sub-par equipment. All in all it worked out. There are a few edges here and there I still might clean up later, but it is 100% serviceable right now and, IMHO, looks great. If you know what you are looking for you can easily tell that this is not a tactical model FS2000, but it fits the spirit of the tactical model. It is, for all intents and purposes, functionally equivalent to the tactical model (ignoring the fact that I don't have the factory tactical iron sights on here).

Warning: this post is a work in progress and I will be editing it for clarification/misspelling/other issues.

Here is the finished product, after I remembered the sling attachment point:



And here is the tutorial:

Separate the upper receiver from the body.


First, remove the sling swivel.




Next, begin removing the 2mm screws - don't lose them.


Continue removing the screws.


More screws. There are 6 total. 4 of them are the same length, 1 on the bottom is longer, and 1 on the bottom is shorter.


More screws. This is the short one.


Final 3 screws. The long one is on the far left.


All screws removed and relative to their positions.


Peel the polymer housing apart.


Continue removing the polymer frame.


Remove the barrel and rail/ejection tube group completely from the polymer frame. It might be a bit sticky but it just pulls out. A barrel support plate and the rail/ejection tube group will be sort of slotted in there.


The rail/ejection tube group slides off of the rear of the barrel.


Pop the rail and barrel apart completely.


More angles of the parts separated.


Again, the parts separated. The rail group is what we are swapping out.


Ok, now these nasty little crenelations are going to have to go. They get in the way of the much larger tactical rail group. Dremel time.


A few of the crenelations dremeled away.


The other half of the frame. Dremel these too.


Again, a few of the crenelations dremeled away.


Crenelations gone. You also have to dremel the sides a bit too to get the new rail to fully seat. It is a tiny bit wider than the frame for the standard.


Ok, now we have to get rid of some plastic. The space where the optics cover release button sits has to go. I cut it off entirely, in line with the plastic leading up to the sling swivel attachment point in the front. I forgot at the time, but you actually want to dremel it in a bit just behind the front attachment point for the sling, too, IF you have the tactical model sling attachment point.


First I tried sawing a bit off to gauge how much space I needed. Again, I ended up deciding to just cut in a straight line.


Completely sawed off, before sanding.


Sanding bit for the cordless dremel.


Sanding off where the crenelations were. This doesn't have to be pretty, it just has to be smooth. The tactical rail group will cover this up.


More sanding and dremeling. At this point, just reassemble the rifle with the tactical rail vice the standard rail. It may be a pain to slide into the top portions of the polymer frame, but with enough sanding and pushing it will go in. If a little elbow grease doesn't get it in, you need to sand more. Don't force it.


Finished product, more or less. This is before I remembered to take it apart and put the sling attachment point on.


Ditto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Excellent pics and description....will I do it....probably not as living in Canada makes it hard to fix things that "break". Parts are non-existent up here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,418 Posts
dubcee said:
:p

I am so tempted.......
You can forgo the Dremel work and cutting, but it will cost an extra $200.00 for the factory barrel support side panels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
@ young guns

Hey we got te same setup all the way down to te devil dog part lol I got an Osprey FDE for my FNP and so far stocked Fs2000. I'm thinking about getting that ACOG ECOS for the Fs2k.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Man I so want to do this, but in a weird way I like the Alien Vagina look too. Man I don't know which way to go! I think the only way to take care of this problem is to have both of them! lol

Looks good man and thanks for the tutorial, been wondering if this was even possible to do and look so clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Now that I have installed the factory sights, the only way to tell is to intimately know the FS2000. The clues that it is a conversion are the crenelations still remaining on the top, and the placement of the serial number. But it all definitely looks factory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Recently, I ended up replacing the barrel support plates with legitimate FS2000 Tactical plates, making the conversion 100% complete as it would come from factory. There is no longer anything to distinguish this weapon from an FS2000 Tactical. For anyone to know, they would have to have access to some kind of algorithm or database associating serial numbers with model types.

Considering that I did this (that I bought the Tactical support plates), it would have been smarter to hold out and keep the Standard barrel support plates as they were, so that I would still have all of the parts necessary to convert back to a standard if I ever felt like it. It of course was not all planned out, though - I wasn't sure how this would go or what would happen, and I was more excited to see if it were possible than I was careful to maximize the return for each dollar spent. I am happy that I went through all of the cutting and customizing that I did, because it was an amazing learning experience, and it gave me something to share with all of you. As far as my recommendations would go, though, unless you just have a spirit for adventure (as I often do), just buy the Tactical support plates, forego the dremeling, and keep everything pristine. I have already gone through the trouble of exploring the options for you, so reap the rewards without paying the price!

As it stands, I basically have one factory set of tactical support plates and one set of "custom" ones. The custom cut support plates buckled out to the side the tiniest bit and in the end I just felt like I wanted the real deal. Nevertheless, the custom cut ones always functioned flawlessly, and the tiny issues regarding bending or buckling could have been fixed with some further dremeling. But sometimes you just want factory, and if it's within your budget, why not, right? I'm at the point now where I would rather invest in the guns I already own than buy new ones anyhow.




As many of you know, I have a stock OD Green FS2000 as well, and it is a phenomenal carbine as well, but this one here is one of those weapons I will never sell and will always own. I have done (and undone) some crazy and interesting things to and with it. As many of you know, it has been cut, sanded, painted, stripped, polished, broken, fixed, customized, and who knows what else. And there is no way I could overstate how much I have learned about the FS2000 platform via working on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,026 Posts
Nice threat, great job "chapeau bas" :icon_clap:
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top