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I would like to purchase a laser sight and light for my ps90 and was hoping for some advice or recommendations. I do not own any laser sight or light system for any of my weapons so this will be my first experience.

I am planning on buying the extended rail from Damage Industries to mount these items on. I also want them to have the remote switch with the plate ran down and mounted using vecro and/or ty wraps.

Since I am new to the ps90 I was hoping for some guidance to what works well for the weapon and what I should be comparing before purchase.

Thanks in advance for any help!
 

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smtech - I purchased a Surefire Tail Cap Switch Assembly for the x300 and it is model #XT107. It comes with the tail cap assembly already wired to the pressure pad. The pressure pad has notches to secure to the rail. IMO its not the best option but works at the moment. Another member here on the forum Kalmar cut the rubber notches off
the pressure pad for his SCAR and then applied velcro to the back of the pressure pad and then to the receiver on his SCAR so he could determine the best placement of the pressure pad that worked for his application. I really like the laser/light and pressure pad setup. Its nice. Sorry for the cell phone pics.

View attachment 31991 View attachment 31992
 

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I vote no on all the above and say go stream light! Tlr-2. Get the pressure pad and your good to go! U can get strobe, green laser, red laser, high output-- lots of configs. I believe the have highest lumen per laser light combo.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001C5XJG4/ref=redir_mdp_mobile?keywords=streamlight&qid=1413501256&ref_=sr_ph&sr=1
That is a good price, A couple of years ago I paid 299 and they only had a red TLR 2 at that time. I'm still holding out for my baby ACOG and my Viriden green laser someday I'll scrape together the cheese to purchase.
 
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$20 Chinese green laser. The pressure switches are terrible so I don't use them. Very high output, can be seen on distant mountains at night.

20141102_011725_resized.jpg
 

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$20 Chinese green laser. The pressure switches are terrible so I don't use them. Very high output, can be seen on distant mountains at night.

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Do not use Chinese green lasers UNLESS you add a QUALITY I.R. Filter. WHY?


Green laser pointers appeared on the market circa 2000, and are the most common type of DPSS lasers (also called DPSSFD for "diode pumped solid state frequency-doubled"). They are more complicated than standard red laser pointers, because laser diodes are not commonly available in this wavelength range. The green light is generated in an indirect process, beginning with a high-power (typically 100–300 mW) infrared AlGaAs laser diode operating at 808 nm. The 808 nm light pumps a crystal of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum vanadate (Nd:YVO4) (or Nd:YAG or less common Nd:YLF), which lases deeper in the infrared at 1064 nm. This lasing action is due to an electronic transition in the fluorescent neodymium ion, Nd(III), which is present in all of these crystals.


The Nd:YVO4 or other Nd-doped crystal is coated on the diode side with a dielectric mirror that reflects at 808 nm and transmits at 1064 nm. The crystal is mounted on a copper block, acting as a heat sink; its 1064 nm output is fed into a crystal of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), mounted on a heat sink in the laser cavity resonator. The orientation of the crystals must be matched, as they are both anisotropic and the Nd:YVO4 outputs polarized light. This unit acts as a frequency doubler, and halves the wavelength to the desired 532 nm. The resonant cavity is terminated by a dielectric mirror that reflects at 1064 nm and transmits at 532 nm. An infrared filter behind the mirror removes IR radiation from the output beam (this may be omitted or inadequate in less-expensive "pointer-style" green lasers), and the assembly ends in a collimator lens.


Nd:YVO4 is replacing other Nd-doped materials such as Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF in such systems because of lower dependency on the exact parameters of the pump diode (therefore allowing for higher tolerances), wider absorption band, lower lasing threshold, higher slope efficiency, linear polarization of output light, and single mode output. For frequency doubling of higher power lasers, LBO is used instead of KTP. Newer lasers use a composite Nd:YVO4/KTP crystal instead of two discrete ones.


Some green lasers operate in pulse or quasi-continuous wave (QCW) mode, to reduce cooling problems and prolong battery life.


An announcement in 2009 of a direct green laser (which does not requiring doubling) promises much higher efficiencies and could foster the development of new color video projectors.


In 2012, Nichia and OSRAM developed and manufactured merchant high-power green laser diodes (515/520 nm) which can emit green laser directly.


This is a report on testing Chinese green lasers...



Reflections on IR are virtually not detectable by the human eye...


Class IIIb: Lasers in this class may cause damage if the beam enters the eye directly. This generally applies to lasers powered from 5-500 mW. Lasers in this category can cause permanent eye damage with exposures of 1/100th of a second or less depending on the strength of the laser. A diffuse reflection is generally not hazardous but specular reflections can be just as dangerous as direct exposures. Protective eyewear is recommended when direct beam viewing of Class IIIb lasers may occur.


And when they say "direct beam viewing" they are referring to observing the beam, not looking directly into the laser.


Near-infrared laser beams are much more hazardous than visible light with the same power level, because their radiation is focused to the retina just in the same way as visible light, whereas the blinking reflex of the human eye (normally closing the eye's lid quickly when the intensity is too high) is not active. Also, no warning is possible e.g. through weak stray light: nothing can be seen when a dangerous beam propagates in an unexpected direction.


In December 2009, we purchased three inexpensive, green laser pointers (GLPs) for $15 each. Advertised to produce ‘10mW’ of green light, the common packaging of the devices suggests that they were produced by the same manufacturer, although they carried no traceable trademarks. One of the pointers produced much weaker green light than the other two. We performed quantitative measurements, showing that the weak unit emitted approximately 10 times more invisible IR light than the visible green. Green light activates the eye's blink reflex, which provides a protective mechanism. However, we are completely vulnerable to IR radiation, since exposure to it may only be noticed after significant retinal damage has occurred. After further investigation, we found that this problem is common in low-cost GLPs, although its seriousness varies widely.


The decision is yours the same as whether you want to risk learning to walk by the feel of a white cane.

This report scared the crap out of me on cheap unmodified Chinese lasers.


Look, this is DANGEROUS!


And I've "done" dangerous for years...


I've went into barricaded hostage situations involving an armed felon
I have a Commercial Display Fireworks license and have shot up to 16" shells that weighed 80 pounds
I have been in pursuits on Interstates in excess of 140 miles per hour


BUT I draw the line on Chinese DPSS lasers.

IF you want a SAFE green laser, make sure it's an Osram Native green diode, not a DPSS diode.
 

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Will do, I'll "flesh it out" a little more.

Keep in mind, you CAN add an I.R. Filter. (and fairly cheaply)

One way you can test whether you are throwing I.R. everywhere is use the Green laser in a large dark room and view it with a video camera to watch it. Most video cameras (pretty sure ALL newer Sony's) "see" I.R.

If you see illumination where the laser isn't hitting ie: to your sides and on you there is I.R. reflecting and it's DANGEROUS. I quit using my green laser pointer at work over this issue.
 

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If you see illumination where the laser isn't hitting ie: to your sides and on you there is I.R. reflecting and it's DANGEROUS. I quit using my green laser pointer at work over this issue.
Sure about this part? Both my Surefire X400 green and CT green light up a dark room when used.
 

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All CCD imagers will pick up IR.
 

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What I use and how it is set up.

There are so many of these out there it is hard to know which are ok. I believe Ebay now has a policy that all greens must contain an IR filter. But can you trust the vendor in China? Buy a filter and epoxy it into the screw off cap just in case, they are only a couple bucks each.

Great video explanation:
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CEQQtwIwAw&url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pghJrvIgtYw&ei=KAyrVIvfOMq_ggSJlIOwBQ&usg=AFQjCNG6O8_y9e__MpEneIiHNC-tYUNlsQ&sig2=MidO4gRZ1U3TapUlRbZXmg&bvm=bv.82001339,d.eXY

Filters I bought:
Pair Camera 9 5mm Optical UV IR Cut Filter UV IR Blocking Filter | eBay

I use a green that I built myself including an IR cut filter epoxied inside the cap to make sure the one mounted in the module is legit. I lose a few mw but it's safe from IR anyways. Total non-IR is around 100 mw and still very dangerous to the eye even with the IR filtered out. I have several interchangeable ones and this one for outdoors is easily visible in bright sunlight at 75 yards. I would never go over 30 mw for the indoor one I keep on it while stashed. I have others with turreted windage and elevation but I like the clean lines of the one I mounted.

These are definitely not toys and should be considered dangerous. Should not use the lasers closeup without specific filtering goggles. If you are planning on building your own sight and testing it get the goggles. As long as you are pointing it downrange you will be OK. Don't point it at glass or mirrors. Yeah I know it sounds obvious but hey, there are lots of folks that have damaged their eyes with these things. Pays to be extra careful.

Cheap green laser safety goggles
HDE Laser Eye Protection Safety Glasses for Green and Blue Lasers with Case (Red) - Silk N Flash Go - Amazon.com

I mounted the laser using TROS Low Profile mount and the clamp that came with the laser. Tight fit here. On mine you can't take off the laser mount without removing the TROS Low Profile mount screws and taking it out too, not enough room. Installed looks great though. Ran the wire through the hole under the mount and affixed the switch with the Velcro that came with the laser.

Note: those Velcro fasteners are ok but can slide around over time. I removed the Velcro and it left a layer of the adhesive on the switch pad, which makes a perfect non-permanent bond with the stock. No Velcro needed. I'm a lefty so my thumb rests on the switch pad when I pick up the gun.

With this type of setup you can unscrew the back of the laser to replace the battery and maintain zero.

ps. Most of the laser gun sights I bought measured a minimum of 30 mw although advertised as 5 mw. Bought mine last year so not sure this is still the case.

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