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The scar will eat anything (7.62x51/.308 flavor) you feed it. There is not really a "best" all round ammo for the 17. The best ammo depends heavily on the circumstances. Basically what are you looking to do with it?

For bench rest shooting would be 168gr match ammo. Federal gold medal match has it but I use PRVI 168gr BTHP match to great effect as well.

If you want to be cheap and you're just throwing lead down range at minute of man then some 7.62x51 147gr ball would be the best because it's the cheapest and will get the job done.

If you're hunting then it's highly subjective. There are a lot of good hunting rounds out there. I went with Barnes TSX and it got the job done and killed the deer but they ran too far for my liking. So I switched to Hornady 165gr soft points. It's not reccomended to shoot soft points out of the Scar because the tip of the bullet impacts the "feed ramp" pretty hard and deforms the soft lead tip. It also would cause lead fouling if you shot hundreds of rounds of soft points through it. If you're just shooting one here or there for hunting then it shouldn't be a problem. I tested them and the point of impact is very close to where my 168gr match rounds do which is a big plus in my book.

So as you can see you have to pick a round that matches your application. Also please note that this is all my opinion and your mileage may vary.

Happy shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hi there. thanks for the reply. im a noob so please bare with me here. are all hunting rounds soft tip? whats the difference between hunting with soft tip ammo and ammo that isn't soft tip, like say bench ammo? would bench ammo be effective at hunting.
 

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hi there. thanks for the reply. im a noob so please bare with me here. are all hunting rounds soft tip? whats the difference between hunting with soft tip ammo and ammo that isn't soft tip, like say bench ammo? would bench ammo be effective at hunting.
I put the info in your other thread as well. Match bullets are not generally used for hunting because they tend to fragment or separate upon impact. Hunting rounds do not have to be soft point. Sometimes they have a hollow tip or a balistic (polymer) tip. The tip is important but what's most important is how the core is constructed and if it's bonded to the jacket. If it's bonded it will hold together better as it travels through the animal leaving one would channel usually. That being said match rounds could be used for hunting in a pinch. They are very inconsistent though when it comes to the type of damage they do.
 

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Federal Classic and Remington Core-Lokt are two of your basic, common, affordable hunting rounds with adequate, reliably expanding bullets. Bullet weight may depend on game. I use a .308 bolt to hunt elk, deer, bear, wolf...all with the same load, but coyotes and prairie dogs get a lighter faster bullet. I'd say it's time for some research to see what bullet, and load suits your needs. But there are so many good options out there, it shouldn't be too hard to find one.
 

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For paper punching and range fun, Prvi surplus (145 gr I believe it was) is my favorite. For hunting, I have really liked the Hornady Whitetail 150 gr rounds. Everything I have shot thus far has dropped where it stood.
 

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Bulk XM118 is really good stuff. A step down to Bulk XM80 is still decent, but costs about half of the XM118.
 

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All Russian made ammo burns dirty. More cleaning needed.
 

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Bulk XM118 is really good stuff. A step down to Bulk XM80 is still decent, but costs about half of the XM118.
Sorry, there is a need to clarify, you want XM118LR. This is basically bulk military 175 grain match ammo. It should be from overruns of lake city army contracts, thus the low price, yet good quality.
 

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I ran a few hundred of those rounds without the slightest hiccup. Yes it's rather dirty, but the 17s ate it up.

I had a chance this last weekend to put just over 400 rounds of Mk319 through it while ripping the hell out of an old pick up truck, and the penetration ability of that particular round is Unbelievable!
 

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I wouldn't run steel cases through the SCAR. I wouldn't run it through anything but an AK.
Why is that?

I ran a few hundred of those rounds without the slightest hiccup. Yes it's rather dirty, but the 17s ate it up.

I had a chance this last weekend to put just over 400 rounds of Mk319 through it while ripping the hell out of an old pick up truck, and the penetration ability of that particular round is Unbelievable!
Good to know, I don't care much about dirtiness.
 

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Because steel cases are rougher than brass is on weapons. Brass is much softer. Plus, I reload, so the savings from cheap steel cases don't save me anything in the long run.
 

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Because steel cases are rougher than brass is on weapons. Brass is much softer. Plus, I reload, so the savings from cheap steel cases don't save me anything in the long run.
Steel case is fine. The accelerated wear is on your extractor and shell deflector... and you won't noticeably see that accelerated wear unless you shoot thousands of it. To a greater degree of concern is bi-metal jacketed projectiles. Since the bi-metal jacket is harder than copper, bore wear is a concern. But, again, it's not THAT big of a deal unless you shoot lots and lots of it. This whole "I won't shoot steel unless its an AK" notion is an overly generalized blanket statement that is not 100% correct. It is only correct based on the condition of volume of fire. Even with an AK, if you shoot nothing but steel you will still see wear after thousands of rounds.

Getting back on topic, yesterday I shot Colt 168 gr HPBT steel cased, PPU 168 gr HPBT, ZQI 147gr FMJ and Freedom Munitions remanufactured 168 gr A-MAX. The remanufactured A-MAX blew the rest out of the water. The consistency was impressive. Didn't have to try very hard at all to print overlapping groups at 100 yards. Price was good too, 240 rounds for $186.80. Plus, they've been having promotions like free shipping or 5% off.

For medium range, I'd venture to guess even the cheaper 155gr A-MAX would still be very good. But since the price difference isn't huge, 168gr is probably a better choice for greater flexibility.

If you don't reload yourself, Freedom has a brass trade-in program where you can send in your used brass for store credit.

I've shot the Colt Barnaul through a M1A scout, FN SPR A4 and now the 17. The M1A had inconsistent cycling issues with it because the steel case can be sticky. With the SPR it took effort to work the bolt at times. The 17, however, had zero issues. It just did not care and ran like a swiss watch.

Here's what I would do if you intend to stock up on ammo. Get some of both. Shoot the brass stuff now while prices are decent and save the Colt Barnaul for when prices spike again (like post Sandy Hook). Because in those times, brass ammo will be precious and scarce. Let 2014 be a lesson.

If you insist on avoiding steel, stock up on ZQI now for cheap plinking and for when times get rough. Granted it isn't 168 gr, but it will still shoot decently and it will gain value (being brass, more so than the Barnaul) when market demand increase. Price between the ZQ1 and Barnaul are very close.
 
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